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150 Seeds

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Nine Star Perennial Broccoli

Brassica oleracea botrytis cv.
HOW TO GROW PERENNIAL BROCCOLI

Start indoors 6–8 week before last frost and transplant or direct sow in April. Harvesting central head will cause 6-12 smaller heads to grow. If you plant them too closely and they become leggy, transplant deeper, buried stems will grow roots. Can take up to 10 months before they produce fully rounded caulis, the the sprouts they produce meantime can of course be eaten. Broccoli grows best in the 60s˚F. Prefers rich fertile soil. Do not overfeed winter crops as this makes them more susceptible to frost damage. This plant grows larger than a cauliflower and needs to be at least 2.5–3’ (90cm) away from the next plant. See additional growing instructions online in our Nine Star variety description. Soil pH 6.1-7.0. Hardiness zones 9. Perennial.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Usual seed life: 5 years. Isolation distance for seed saving: 1 mile.

Planting Depth 1/2”
Soil Temp. Germ. 70-75˚F
Days to Germ. 12-21
Plant Spacing 2–3”
Row Spacing 4–5’
Days To Maturity 300
Part Shade, Moist Well Drained

 

  • Nine Star Perennial Broccoli
  • Nine Star Perennial Broccoli
  • 100 Seeds$3.75
A perennial cauliflower which produces approximately ten or more tennis ball sized custard yellow heads per year. Looks aside, it tastes just like sprouting broccoli, perhaps even better but really it's just a cauliflower. It gets the name Nine Star from its growth habit. In April, one small head appears centrally, ...
A perennial cauliflower which produces approximately ten or more tennis ball sized custard yellow heads per year. Looks aside, it tastes just like sprouting broccoli, perhaps even better but really it's just a cauliflower. It gets the name Nine Star from its growth habit. In April, one small head appears centrally, the size of a baby cauli. Cut this off and eat it, perhaps roasted in the oven with a little oil and lemon juice so the edges just crisp. Then nine or so smaller florets appear around the central head, just like sprouting broccoli. Sometimes, particularly if you have fed the plant with chicken manure pellets in early spring, you get even more smaller florets, which are perfect for salads. Excess cauliflowers can be frozen. Leaves can be shredded and used in coleslaw or stir fried. Crop season is early Spring.

Closer to the original biennial wild broccoli, does not flower until the second year. Does not form a consolidated head as in annual cultivated broccoli, produces small white cauliflowers in early spring. More of a hardy broccoli, not a true perennial. As long as you dead head it and don't let it run to seed, it sticks around. It will crop every spring for at least three years, after which it gets a bit tired. Cut heads back in spring not allowing the plant to go to seed, will continue growing for several seasons. Trim back the plant a little after cropping with shears to encourage new growth once they are getting huge. (i.e. cut off about 18" (45 cm) of foliage). Remove aphids at the first sign by spraying water and checking again in a few days. Use a physical barrier such as insect netting to protect from white cabbage moth. To suppress weed growth and to encourage good root growth mulch with good organic compost. Tags: Heritage: Heirloom, Season: Spring Fall, Certification: Organic." perennial Heritage: Heirloom, Season: Spring Fall
Learn More
  • Nine Star Perennial Broccoli
  • Nine Star Perennial Broccoli

Nine Star Perennial Broccoli

Brassica oleracea botrytis cv.
A perennial cauliflower which produces approximately ten or more tennis ball sized custard yellow heads per year. Looks aside, it tastes just like sprouting broccoli, perhaps even better but really it's just a cauliflower. It gets the name Nine Star from its gr...
A perennial cauliflower which produces approximately ten or more tennis ball sized custard yellow heads per year. Looks aside, it tastes just like sprouting broccoli, perhaps even better but really it's just a cauliflower. It gets the name Nine Star from its growth habit. In April, one small head appears centrally, the size of a baby cauli. Cut this off and eat it, perhaps roasted in the oven with a little oil and lemon juice so the edges just crisp. Then nine or so smaller florets appear around the central head, just like sprouting broccoli. Sometimes, particularly if you have fed the plant with chicken manure pellets in early spring, you get even more smaller florets, which are perfect for salads. Excess cauliflowers can be frozen. Leaves can be shredded and used in coleslaw or stir fried. Crop season is early Spring.

Closer to the original biennial wild broccoli, does not flower until the second year. Does not form a consolidated head as in annual cultivated broccoli, produces small white cauliflowers in early spring. More of a hardy broccoli, not a true perennial. As long as you dead head it and don't let it run to seed, it sticks around. It will crop every spring for at least three years, after which it gets a bit tired. Cut heads back in spring not allowing the plant to go to seed, will continue growing for several seasons. Trim back the plant a little after cropping with shears to encourage new growth once they are getting huge. (i.e. cut off about 18" (45 cm) of foliage). Remove aphids at the first sign by spraying water and checking again in a few days. Use a physical barrier such as insect netting to protect from white cabbage moth. To suppress weed growth and to encourage good root growth mulch with good organic compost. Tags: Heritage: Heirloom, Season: Spring Fall, Certification: Organic." perennial Heritage: Heirloom, Season: Spring Fall
Learn More
HOW TO GROW PERENNIAL BROCCOLI

Start indoors 6–8 week before last frost and transplant or direct sow in April. Harvesting central head will cause 6-12 smaller heads to grow. If you plant them too closely and they become leggy, transplant deeper, buried stems will grow roots. Can take up to 10 months before they produce fully rounded caulis, the the sprouts they produce meantime can of course be eaten. Broccoli grows best in the 60s˚F. Prefers rich fertile soil. Do not overfeed winter crops as this makes them more susceptible to frost damage. This plant grows larger than a cauliflower and needs to be at least 2.5–3’ (90cm) away from the next plant. See additional growing instructions online in our Nine Star variety description. Soil pH 6.1-7.0. Hardiness zones 9. Perennial.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Usual seed life: 5 years. Isolation distance for seed saving: 1 mile.

Planting Depth 1/2”
Soil Temp. Germ. 70-75˚F
Days to Germ. 12-21
Plant Spacing 2–3”
Row Spacing 4–5’
Days To Maturity 300
Part Shade, Moist Well Drained

 

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