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SEED CALCULATOR

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Painted Mountain

Zea mays
HOW TO GROW CORN, FLOUR

Corn takes about 14 days to emerge from 50°F soils but only about 5 days to emerge at 70°F. Plant about mid May in the Midwestern U.S., as early as mid April in milder climates. Can direct seed as early as mid February with row cover in mild temperate climates. In regions with short growing seasons, start indoors two plants per cell 3-4 weeks before last frost, plant out after frost. Some soak seeds in water tepid for an hour or two before planting. If cool and wet, plant shallow 1 to 1-1/2”. If hot and dry plant 2–3”. Plant in blocks to ensure the best wind pollination. corn types are sweet corn, starch, parch, flint, dent, popcorn and ornamental. Open pollinated corn varies more than hybrid corn. Soil pH 5.8-7.0. Hardiness zones 4-8. Annual.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 120–156 seeds per ounce, about 10–15 pounds per acre. Federal germination standard: 75%. Usual seed life: 5-10 years. Isolation distance for seed saving: 2 miles.

Planting Depth 1-2”
Soil Temp. Germ. 55–65˚F
Days to Germ. 4-12
Plant Spacing 8”
Row Spacing 30”
Days To Maturity 85
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained

Painted Mountain Seed Count
.25 Pound ≈ 381 seeds
1 Pound ≈ 1,522 seeds
  • Painted Mountain corn, flour image####

  • Painted Mountain corn, flour image##Photo: Dave Christensen##

    Photo: Dave Christensen

    📷
  • 150 Seeds$3.95
  • 1/4 Pound$14.36
  • 1 Pound$53.20
Developed over 44 years by Dave Christensen for its hardiness, earliness, and colorful display in the mountains of Montana above 5000’. Avg. 6-7" multicolor ears for decorating, easy grinding, roasting, or use in hominy grits. Also makes a high-nutrition flour. Avg. 4' plants. Painted Mountain has a lot of desert an...
Developed over 44 years by Dave Christensen for its hardiness, earliness, and colorful display in the mountains of Montana above 5000’. Avg. 6-7" multicolor ears for decorating, easy grinding, roasting, or use in hominy grits. Also makes a high-nutrition flour. Avg. 4' plants. Painted Mountain has a lot of desert ancestry. It can have mold problems if it is grown where there is a lot of rain, especially rains in Fall if it is harvested late.

Dave Christensen writes, “PAINTED MOUNTAIN CORN: INFORMATION FOR CATALOGUE LISTING

 

I will give you much more information than you need. You are free to extract what you wish to use. This information will be shared with all of my customers. Some of you have very accurate listing. Some of the ads have very incorrect information, which doesn't really hurt anything. I will be happy to review how you list it.

Painted Mountain Corn is an heirloom corn. It is a composite of heirloom corns from the Indians and Homesteaders of Montana and the surrounding region. Painted Mountain was created by Dave Christensen of Big Timber, Montana 45 years ago. Dave has maintained it and made it his life's work to develop it and improve it every year.  It is organic and a sustainable open pollinated variety. 

DUAL PURPOSE

It's variety of amazing colors excites people harvesting it! And it is a hit all over the nation at farmer's markets. Small plants produce long beautiful ears. This fast-maturing stress-hardy flour corn is feeding people on every continent of the world. It's famous as a survival food.

Plants are 4' - 6' tall with ears 6" - 12" depending upon water. Average probably 4 ½’ plants with 7” ears.

ORNAMENTAL

Painted Mountain Corn is largely grown in America for an ornamental decorative corn for Fall. It has some of the brightest colors of any corn. It has amazing true reds which can be found almost nowhere else. Almost everyone harvesting says that it is like Christmas morning pulling back the husks and being excited and delighted with amazing colored ears. Every ear is different.

FOR FOOD

A significant amount of customers buy it for grain to feed their families. It can be made into corn bread and any number of the hundreds of foods you can make out of flour corn.  Painted Mountain has a soft flour starch which grinds quickly into a soft fluffy flour. Soft flour starch is the most useful of all types of starch for human and animal food. When making corn bread you do not need to add soft white wheat flour to it because if is already soft. You can use it 100% and made the tastiest cornbread ever.

Other food uses are: hominy, soups, stews, corn chowder, boiled and fried in bacon, pasole, parched corn for snack food. And yes, you can pick it fresh for corn the cob. It will not be a sugary as sweet corn, but is more enjoyable than field corn. This minor use is probably not worth mentioning.

The true purpose of Painted Mountain Corn is to feed people. Not as corn on the cob, but as a grain. I foresaw climate change and preserved the genetics of Montana's Indian corns because they are the most hardy grains in the world. The corn survives better than any others for short growing seasons with cold and late season frosts, and it endures draught, and hot mid-summers without irrigation.

Painted Mountain is native to the arid West, and is promoted for regions of world with dry climates and short growing seasons. It is adapted for places with day length far from the equator.

I do not advertise it for the tropical regions of the world where there is a lot of moisture and fungal diseases for which it has had no reason to develop immunity. However I have been surprised over the decades at the abundance of success stories coming from every state in the USA, including the Northeast. And I even get reports from some villages in tropical regions of the world where it's quick maturity gives it an advantage over weather problems.

It is grown on every continent in the world as a grain for people to eat, particularly in stressed location where indigenous farmers are starving because their environments are so stressed. It is grown from Iceland to New Zealand, Mongolia, Siberia, Ukraine, Canada, South America, Africa, etc. I have even taken it to North Korea where is has increased the grain production in their northern mountains 260%.

This year ag experts in regions of Spain and Italy say that Painted Mountain is the only corn that survived the draughts caused by global warming and produced grain to feed people.

NUTRITION

Painted Mountain corn, along with other open pollinated heirloom corns, has almost twice the protein as modern industrial corn. I tested the protein of Painted Mountain corn given overseas for relief food and it tested 14% protein. It can range between 11% and 14%. The commercial corn that the US was giving people was only about 8% protein.

The easily digestible soft flour starch of Painted Mountain corn makes all the nutrients 30% more available for human absorption.  Taking human digestibility into consideration pushes Painted Mountain far above modern corns.

The colors are antioxidants for the protection of cells. They prevent oxidation and aging of all cells in the body. Every color is a different mix of antioxidants. The bigger the variety the better as they compliment each other. We all know now that colored plant foods like blue berries, red cabbage, and colored peppers provide antioxidants, and anti-inflammatories. It's the same thing. For people who have limited fresh fruits and veggies in winter, the colored corn provides antioxidants to keep people healthy in famine.

SURVIAL FOOD

As people become more concerned about the take-over of transgenic foods, the potential failure of industrial agriculture as predicted by NASA, the possible collapse of the economic system, collapse of big cities, people want to know that they could feed themselves if they needed to some day. Many people are making their own seed banks.

Painted Mountain is perhaps the first choice for a survival garden kit. Grain is the main staple for human food. Nothing is easier to grow than corn. How many survival kits only have sweet corn seed?  People need grain.

Painted Mountain is the fastest maturing, and can escape droughts, hail storm and weather disasters better than other corns. Sales could skyrocket if Painted Mountain was advertised as a survival seed bank. I have not advertised it as such yet because I have not had enough to supply all the demand yet.

ADVANCEMENT OF THE CORN

I spend my full year breeding corn.  In winter I hand select individual kernels to be planted.  In summer I hand pollinate 5,000 plants.

I have been working very hard to improve the plant's architecture, standability, stress hardiness, uniformity, yield, nutrition and the beautiful colors of this Native corn. I do this advancement work without pay. I live on a shoestring because the development of Painted Mountain is saving lives every day.

I have not crossed it to anything modern. It remains a Native heirloom corn with almost half a century of love and selection to make it more productive and dependable.

GMO CONCERNS

When people hear that I do "breeding", they are conditioned to suspect that I am making Painted Mountain into GMO corn. Not so! That is ridiculous. I cannot afford that million dollar technology. Besides I am breeding Native corn so that people have a healthy alternative to GMO corn which is carcinogenic and toxic. Heirloom corn is the natural alternative and antidote to GMO corn. I only use old time natural selection and breeding techniques. I only use a lab to test for nutrition.

Painted Mountain is grown too far away from any other corn to be contaminated by other pollen. Painted Mountain is grown in remote places of Montana, where the climate is too short and harsh for other corns to grow. I test it every year to prove that there is no contamination. Those test results come in around December if anyone wants them.

PLANTING

Painted Mountain is the most cold-hardy corn for early spring planting.

The biggest mistake in catalogues is to treat Painted Mountain as other corns and say "DO NOT PLANT UNTIL DANGER OF FROST IS PAST." WRONG!!!! Painted Mountain corn is developed to survive the cold soil in early spring planting. It is developed in the Mountains of Montana at 5,000' elevation to sit in cold wet soil with freezes and emerge with amazing vigor when it warms up. And then to recover from further freezes.

I recommend planting by May 15 in the highest elevation where it will freeze and frost into June. In warmer climates plant it earlier to get growing before July's drought hits.

As far as spacing of plants goes, you can do anything with it that you want. There are many ways you can space it, some better than others, but the instructions can get too complicated.  The shorter the season the more space it should be given.  I would caution that the plants are short and should not be planted where they will be shaded out by taller plants.

If you plant sweet corn and ornamental corn in the same garden, there will be pollen exchange and the sweet corn will lose some of it's sweetness. Pollen contamination of seed will make it so you need to start out with a fresh seed supply next year.

DAY LENGTH

Corns are listed competitively for how fast they mature. This system is highly undependable. I expect the day lengths are adjusted to Iowa, or someplace where they have warm days and warm nights. Some people measure it to when it is officially mature but not actually dry. Adding to the confusion is that some people give corn a day length for table ready sweet corn, and not to dry grain.

If I was to list Painted Mountain as faster than the fastest maturing commercial corn, I would have to list it as a 65 day corn. But that would be a joke.

To be honest, at our high elevation with cold springs, cold falls, and cold nights, Painted Mountain makes dry grain at 100-110 days. Then it is dry enough to harvest. In warm regions it might make dry grain in 80 days.

You might list it as 80-100 days if you wish, to play the game. People who experiment with heirloom corns say that Painted Mountain matures before anything they tried, often by weeks.

You would be honest if you listed Painted Mountain to have a shorter growing season than any other corn, except maybe tiny Tom Thumb plants with tiny little ears.

You would be more accurate just to state that Painted Mountain is the "fastest maturing grain corn that you have found".

Plant type: not for machine harvest.

People planting acres and expecting to harvest them with a combine will be disappointed.  Machine harvesting requires tall strong-stalked plants.  Painted Mountain’s small plants must be hand harvested. The plants put all their energy into the grain, and not into tall strong stalks. Because they do not have to grow tall woody stalks they take less nutrients out of the land. And the efficient plants endure hardship and stress and still produce grain.

Modern people familiar with industrial machine harvestable corn do not understand the value of the small plants. But small plants they feed people where industrial corn fails and people starve. Those who do not understand this will eventually be forced to learn, as global warming exposes the weaknesses of our ecologically un-sustainable industrial life style.

FUTURE YEARS

I am planning for a much bigger harvest next year, and more to sell you. I will plant more acreage, and hire more workers to kill the weeds. I have invested thousands in fences to keep the deer out.

The 2016 weather forecast is for increasing drought with global warming across Montana, so that may block my attempts at high production. We will see.

MORE INFORMATION AND PHOTOS

There are many articles on the web about Painted Mountain Corn, and photos if you Google IMAGES of Painted Mountain Corn. If you see images you like check with me to see if indeed they are photos of Painted Mountain and not something else. Also I have more images of my corn on my computer.

ADVERTISE THAT DAVE GREW YOUR SEED

It's Native ancestors were very primitive plants with many undesirable traits and flaws. These flaws continue to resurface and will do so forever. However Dave has taken the corn a long way in making it more productive, more nutritious and more beautiful. It is wise to state that the seed being sold came directly from Dave.

 I have become aware of a few smaller attempts to grow and sell Painted Mtn Corn, usually without informing me. These people do not understand the selection process and their corn is inferior. Stating that your seed was bred by me will give it more credibility and encourage those who took it from me to be accountable.

 Don’t forget the fun factor!!!

Tags: Type: Flour, Color: Blue, Specialty: Drought Tolerant, Heritage: Heirloom, Certification: Organic.

Corn has been cultivated for at least 5,000 years probably originating in the lowlands of western Mexico. Maize geneticists believe that 90 percent of breeding work in corn had already been done by the time Columbus arrived to find large fields of corn being grown on the island of Hispaniola in 1492. Modern sweet corn most likely descends from flint corns of the northeastern U.S. The sweet corn gene (sugary1, su1) was selected by Native American in at least four additional locations: highlands of Peru, central plateau of Mexico, northwestern Mexico southwestern U.S. and the northern Great Plains.

Native Americans planted corn when the gooseberry bushes were almost in full leaf. They cultivated about 18” diameter, pulled up last year’s dead roots in the spring and formed a hill. Six to eight seeds were planted in the center 9”. Later more earth was hilled up to cover the roots to protect them from the summer sun. Hills were 4’, far enough part so the leaves of mature plants would not touch. Beans and squash were planted after the corn. Beans were planted diagonally between the corn hills across the whole field. Squash was planted in rows outside to separate from the neighbor’s field. Four squash seeds were planted in pairs into opposite sides of a 15” diameter hill.

Companions: squash, pole beans, sunflowers, pumpkins, peas, cucumbers, potatoes, marigold
Inhibitors: tomatoes

Learn More
  • Painted Mountain corn, flour image####

  • Painted Mountain corn, flour image##Photo: Dave Christensen##

    Photo: Dave Christensen

    📷

Painted Mountain

Zea mays
Developed over 44 years by Dave Christensen for its hardiness, earliness, and colorful display in the mountains of Montana above 5000’. Avg. 6-7" multicolor ears for decorating, easy grinding, roasting, or use in hominy grits. Also makes a high-nutrition flour....
Developed over 44 years by Dave Christensen for its hardiness, earliness, and colorful display in the mountains of Montana above 5000’. Avg. 6-7" multicolor ears for decorating, easy grinding, roasting, or use in hominy grits. Also makes a high-nutrition flour. Avg. 4' plants. Painted Mountain has a lot of desert ancestry. It can have mold problems if it is grown where there is a lot of rain, especially rains in Fall if it is harvested late.

Dave Christensen writes, “PAINTED MOUNTAIN CORN: INFORMATION FOR CATALOGUE LISTING

 

I will give you much more information than you need. You are free to extract what you wish to use. This information will be shared with all of my customers. Some of you have very accurate listing. Some of the ads have very incorrect information, which doesn't really hurt anything. I will be happy to review how you list it.

Painted Mountain Corn is an heirloom corn. It is a composite of heirloom corns from the Indians and Homesteaders of Montana and the surrounding region. Painted Mountain was created by Dave Christensen of Big Timber, Montana 45 years ago. Dave has maintained it and made it his life's work to develop it and improve it every year.  It is organic and a sustainable open pollinated variety. 

DUAL PURPOSE

It's variety of amazing colors excites people harvesting it! And it is a hit all over the nation at farmer's markets. Small plants produce long beautiful ears. This fast-maturing stress-hardy flour corn is feeding people on every continent of the world. It's famous as a survival food.

Plants are 4' - 6' tall with ears 6" - 12" depending upon water. Average probably 4 ½’ plants with 7” ears.

ORNAMENTAL

Painted Mountain Corn is largely grown in America for an ornamental decorative corn for Fall. It has some of the brightest colors of any corn. It has amazing true reds which can be found almost nowhere else. Almost everyone harvesting says that it is like Christmas morning pulling back the husks and being excited and delighted with amazing colored ears. Every ear is different.

FOR FOOD

A significant amount of customers buy it for grain to feed their families. It can be made into corn bread and any number of the hundreds of foods you can make out of flour corn.  Painted Mountain has a soft flour starch which grinds quickly into a soft fluffy flour. Soft flour starch is the most useful of all types of starch for human and animal food. When making corn bread you do not need to add soft white wheat flour to it because if is already soft. You can use it 100% and made the tastiest cornbread ever.

Other food uses are: hominy, soups, stews, corn chowder, boiled and fried in bacon, pasole, parched corn for snack food. And yes, you can pick it fresh for corn the cob. It will not be a sugary as sweet corn, but is more enjoyable than field corn. This minor use is probably not worth mentioning.

The true purpose of Painted Mountain Corn is to feed people. Not as corn on the cob, but as a grain. I foresaw climate change and preserved the genetics of Montana's Indian corns because they are the most hardy grains in the world. The corn survives better than any others for short growing seasons with cold and late season frosts, and it endures draught, and hot mid-summers without irrigation.

Painted Mountain is native to the arid West, and is promoted for regions of world with dry climates and short growing seasons. It is adapted for places with day length far from the equator.

I do not advertise it for the tropical regions of the world where there is a lot of moisture and fungal diseases for which it has had no reason to develop immunity. However I have been surprised over the decades at the abundance of success stories coming from every state in the USA, including the Northeast. And I even get reports from some villages in tropical regions of the world where it's quick maturity gives it an advantage over weather problems.

It is grown on every continent in the world as a grain for people to eat, particularly in stressed location where indigenous farmers are starving because their environments are so stressed. It is grown from Iceland to New Zealand, Mongolia, Siberia, Ukraine, Canada, South America, Africa, etc. I have even taken it to North Korea where is has increased the grain production in their northern mountains 260%.

This year ag experts in regions of Spain and Italy say that Painted Mountain is the only corn that survived the draughts caused by global warming and produced grain to feed people.

NUTRITION

Painted Mountain corn, along with other open pollinated heirloom corns, has almost twice the protein as modern industrial corn. I tested the protein of Painted Mountain corn given overseas for relief food and it tested 14% protein. It can range between 11% and 14%. The commercial corn that the US was giving people was only about 8% protein.

The easily digestible soft flour starch of Painted Mountain corn makes all the nutrients 30% more available for human absorption.  Taking human digestibility into consideration pushes Painted Mountain far above modern corns.

The colors are antioxidants for the protection of cells. They prevent oxidation and aging of all cells in the body. Every color is a different mix of antioxidants. The bigger the variety the better as they compliment each other. We all know now that colored plant foods like blue berries, red cabbage, and colored peppers provide antioxidants, and anti-inflammatories. It's the same thing. For people who have limited fresh fruits and veggies in winter, the colored corn provides antioxidants to keep people healthy in famine.

SURVIAL FOOD

As people become more concerned about the take-over of transgenic foods, the potential failure of industrial agriculture as predicted by NASA, the possible collapse of the economic system, collapse of big cities, people want to know that they could feed themselves if they needed to some day. Many people are making their own seed banks.

Painted Mountain is perhaps the first choice for a survival garden kit. Grain is the main staple for human food. Nothing is easier to grow than corn. How many survival kits only have sweet corn seed?  People need grain.

Painted Mountain is the fastest maturing, and can escape droughts, hail storm and weather disasters better than other corns. Sales could skyrocket if Painted Mountain was advertised as a survival seed bank. I have not advertised it as such yet because I have not had enough to supply all the demand yet.

ADVANCEMENT OF THE CORN

I spend my full year breeding corn.  In winter I hand select individual kernels to be planted.  In summer I hand pollinate 5,000 plants.

I have been working very hard to improve the plant's architecture, standability, stress hardiness, uniformity, yield, nutrition and the beautiful colors of this Native corn. I do this advancement work without pay. I live on a shoestring because the development of Painted Mountain is saving lives every day.

I have not crossed it to anything modern. It remains a Native heirloom corn with almost half a century of love and selection to make it more productive and dependable.

GMO CONCERNS

When people hear that I do "breeding", they are conditioned to suspect that I am making Painted Mountain into GMO corn. Not so! That is ridiculous. I cannot afford that million dollar technology. Besides I am breeding Native corn so that people have a healthy alternative to GMO corn which is carcinogenic and toxic. Heirloom corn is the natural alternative and antidote to GMO corn. I only use old time natural selection and breeding techniques. I only use a lab to test for nutrition.

Painted Mountain is grown too far away from any other corn to be contaminated by other pollen. Painted Mountain is grown in remote places of Montana, where the climate is too short and harsh for other corns to grow. I test it every year to prove that there is no contamination. Those test results come in around December if anyone wants them.

PLANTING

Painted Mountain is the most cold-hardy corn for early spring planting.

The biggest mistake in catalogues is to treat Painted Mountain as other corns and say "DO NOT PLANT UNTIL DANGER OF FROST IS PAST." WRONG!!!! Painted Mountain corn is developed to survive the cold soil in early spring planting. It is developed in the Mountains of Montana at 5,000' elevation to sit in cold wet soil with freezes and emerge with amazing vigor when it warms up. And then to recover from further freezes.

I recommend planting by May 15 in the highest elevation where it will freeze and frost into June. In warmer climates plant it earlier to get growing before July's drought hits.

As far as spacing of plants goes, you can do anything with it that you want. There are many ways you can space it, some better than others, but the instructions can get too complicated.  The shorter the season the more space it should be given.  I would caution that the plants are short and should not be planted where they will be shaded out by taller plants.

If you plant sweet corn and ornamental corn in the same garden, there will be pollen exchange and the sweet corn will lose some of it's sweetness. Pollen contamination of seed will make it so you need to start out with a fresh seed supply next year.

DAY LENGTH

Corns are listed competitively for how fast they mature. This system is highly undependable. I expect the day lengths are adjusted to Iowa, or someplace where they have warm days and warm nights. Some people measure it to when it is officially mature but not actually dry. Adding to the confusion is that some people give corn a day length for table ready sweet corn, and not to dry grain.

If I was to list Painted Mountain as faster than the fastest maturing commercial corn, I would have to list it as a 65 day corn. But that would be a joke.

To be honest, at our high elevation with cold springs, cold falls, and cold nights, Painted Mountain makes dry grain at 100-110 days. Then it is dry enough to harvest. In warm regions it might make dry grain in 80 days.

You might list it as 80-100 days if you wish, to play the game. People who experiment with heirloom corns say that Painted Mountain matures before anything they tried, often by weeks.

You would be honest if you listed Painted Mountain to have a shorter growing season than any other corn, except maybe tiny Tom Thumb plants with tiny little ears.

You would be more accurate just to state that Painted Mountain is the "fastest maturing grain corn that you have found".

Plant type: not for machine harvest.

People planting acres and expecting to harvest them with a combine will be disappointed.  Machine harvesting requires tall strong-stalked plants.  Painted Mountain’s small plants must be hand harvested. The plants put all their energy into the grain, and not into tall strong stalks. Because they do not have to grow tall woody stalks they take less nutrients out of the land. And the efficient plants endure hardship and stress and still produce grain.

Modern people familiar with industrial machine harvestable corn do not understand the value of the small plants. But small plants they feed people where industrial corn fails and people starve. Those who do not understand this will eventually be forced to learn, as global warming exposes the weaknesses of our ecologically un-sustainable industrial life style.

FUTURE YEARS

I am planning for a much bigger harvest next year, and more to sell you. I will plant more acreage, and hire more workers to kill the weeds. I have invested thousands in fences to keep the deer out.

The 2016 weather forecast is for increasing drought with global warming across Montana, so that may block my attempts at high production. We will see.

MORE INFORMATION AND PHOTOS

There are many articles on the web about Painted Mountain Corn, and photos if you Google IMAGES of Painted Mountain Corn. If you see images you like check with me to see if indeed they are photos of Painted Mountain and not something else. Also I have more images of my corn on my computer.

ADVERTISE THAT DAVE GREW YOUR SEED

It's Native ancestors were very primitive plants with many undesirable traits and flaws. These flaws continue to resurface and will do so forever. However Dave has taken the corn a long way in making it more productive, more nutritious and more beautiful. It is wise to state that the seed being sold came directly from Dave.

 I have become aware of a few smaller attempts to grow and sell Painted Mtn Corn, usually without informing me. These people do not understand the selection process and their corn is inferior. Stating that your seed was bred by me will give it more credibility and encourage those who took it from me to be accountable.

 Don’t forget the fun factor!!!

Tags: Type: Flour, Color: Blue, Specialty: Drought Tolerant, Heritage: Heirloom, Certification: Organic.

Corn has been cultivated for at least 5,000 years probably originating in the lowlands of western Mexico. Maize geneticists believe that 90 percent of breeding work in corn had already been done by the time Columbus arrived to find large fields of corn being grown on the island of Hispaniola in 1492. Modern sweet corn most likely descends from flint corns of the northeastern U.S. The sweet corn gene (sugary1, su1) was selected by Native American in at least four additional locations: highlands of Peru, central plateau of Mexico, northwestern Mexico southwestern U.S. and the northern Great Plains.

Native Americans planted corn when the gooseberry bushes were almost in full leaf. They cultivated about 18” diameter, pulled up last year’s dead roots in the spring and formed a hill. Six to eight seeds were planted in the center 9”. Later more earth was hilled up to cover the roots to protect them from the summer sun. Hills were 4’, far enough part so the leaves of mature plants would not touch. Beans and squash were planted after the corn. Beans were planted diagonally between the corn hills across the whole field. Squash was planted in rows outside to separate from the neighbor’s field. Four squash seeds were planted in pairs into opposite sides of a 15” diameter hill.

Companions: squash, pole beans, sunflowers, pumpkins, peas, cucumbers, potatoes, marigold
Inhibitors: tomatoes

Learn More
HOW TO GROW CORN, FLOUR

Corn takes about 14 days to emerge from 50°F soils but only about 5 days to emerge at 70°F. Plant about mid May in the Midwestern U.S., as early as mid April in milder climates. Can direct seed as early as mid February with row cover in mild temperate climates. In regions with short growing seasons, start indoors two plants per cell 3-4 weeks before last frost, plant out after frost. Some soak seeds in water tepid for an hour or two before planting. If cool and wet, plant shallow 1 to 1-1/2”. If hot and dry plant 2–3”. Plant in blocks to ensure the best wind pollination. corn types are sweet corn, starch, parch, flint, dent, popcorn and ornamental. Open pollinated corn varies more than hybrid corn. Soil pH 5.8-7.0. Hardiness zones 4-8. Annual.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 120–156 seeds per ounce, about 10–15 pounds per acre. Federal germination standard: 75%. Usual seed life: 5-10 years. Isolation distance for seed saving: 2 miles.

Planting Depth 1-2”
Soil Temp. Germ. 55–65˚F
Days to Germ. 4-12
Plant Spacing 8”
Row Spacing 30”
Days To Maturity 85
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained

Painted Mountain Seed Count
.25 Pound ≈ 381 seeds
1 Pound ≈ 1,522 seeds

Meet Your Farmer

We promote fair trade, organic practices and environmental responsibility throughout the Restoration Seeds supply chain. Below are the family farmers and seed suppliers who bring our open pollinated seeds to you.

Seed We Need Seed grower since 1971
I started growing heirloom Indian corns in 1971, combining and selecting. I do intense self-pollination at home in Big Timber to advance the population. I have 8 farmers who grow different population which is part of the genetic advancement program. I grow a big 2 acre crop at Bob Quinn's organic farm in Big Sandy, Montana. My best genetics gets multiplied there. That is the only farm that I sell seed from. I have to catch a plane for the holidays.
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