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150 Seeds

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SEED CALCULATOR

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SEED CALCULATOR

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Seeds per 100 feet: 0

Red Seeded

Citrullus lanatus var. citroides
HOW TO GROW CITRON MELON

Start indoors 3–4 weeks before last frost, plant out 2 weeks after last frost. Direct seed every 18” when soil is 70˚F. Store at 45˚F. Optimal temperature for plant growth is between 80-95˚F with nighttime temperatures above 70˚F. Water transplants more early on, sparingly as plants mature. Mulch to prevent weed competition. One beehive is suggested per acre for seedless varieties. The most commonly used signs of fruit maturity is to check if the tendril bearing the fruit has dried and withered or if the ground spot has turned a warm yellowish cream color. A number of seed growers give watermelon seed a 1 to 2 day fermentation period which helps free the seed from all endocarp material. Soil pH 6.5-7.5. Hardiness zones 4-9. Annual.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 195 seeds per ounce. Federal germination standard: 70%. Usual seed life: 6 years. Isolation distance for seed saving: 1/2 mile.

Planting Depth 1/2-1”
Soil Temp. Germ. 70-95˚F
Days to Germ. 3-8
Plant Spacing 2-3’
Row Spacing 6’
Days To Maturity 90–100
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained

Red Seeded Seed Count
1 Ounce ≈ 193 seeds
.25 Pound ≈ 771 seeds
  • Red Seeded citron melon image####

  • Red Seeded citron melon image##Photo: Genet, Tsamma melons in the Kalahari Desert.##

    Photo: Genet, Tsamma melons in the Kalahari Desert.

    📷
  • 30 Seeds$4.10
  • 1 Ounce$24.64
  • 1/4 Pound$64.84
The citron melon is a relative of the watermelon botanically known as Citrullus lanatus var. citroides. A centuries old heirloom appearing in manuscripts in 1580, long grown for making preserves and sweetmeats that are used in fruitcakes, cookies and puddings through the winter. It is especially useful for fruit pre...
The citron melon is a relative of the watermelon botanically known as Citrullus lanatus var. citroides. A centuries old heirloom appearing in manuscripts in 1580, long grown for making preserves and sweetmeats that are used in fruitcakes, cookies and puddings through the winter. It is especially useful for fruit preserves, because it has a high pectin content. Hard rinds and firm flesh make Citron melons not an eating melon but rather storage melons. Fruits can be stored for up to a year. The citron rind is very hard and needs to be cut off. There are a great number of seeds and the flesh is hard so using a fork to remove the seeds is necessary. They are ancestors to domestic watermelons and grow wild in Africa. Easy to grow, disease resistant and drought tolerant. Also known as Citrullus caffer, Citrullus amarus, fodder melon for cattle feed, preserving melon, jam melon, pie melon, stock melon, Kalahari and tsamma melon. Tags: Harvest: Mid, Color: White, Size: Small, Shape: Round, Specialty: Heavy Producer, Specialty: Storage, Specialty: Disease Resistant, Specialty: Drought Tolerant, Heritage: Heirloom, Season: Summer.

The citron melon is native to Africa, probably the Kalahari desert, where it still grows abundantly. The time and place of its first domestication is unknown, but it appears to have been grown in ancient Egypt at least four thousand years ago. It is grown as food in Africa, especially dry or desert regions, including South Africa. In some areas, it is even used as a source of water during dry seasons. The citron melon should not be confused with actual citron, a citrus fruit originally used, since ancient Egypt, to repel insects. Delicious Citron Melon recipes.

Companions: potatoes
Inhibitors: tall growing vegetables

Learn More
  • Red Seeded citron melon image####

  • Red Seeded citron melon image##Photo: Genet, Tsamma melons in the Kalahari Desert.##

    Photo: Genet, Tsamma melons in the Kalahari Desert.

    📷

Red Seeded

Citrullus lanatus var. citroides
The citron melon is a relative of the watermelon botanically known as Citrullus lanatus var. citroides. A centuries old heirloom appearing in manuscripts in 1580, long grown for making preserves and sweetmeats that are used in fruitcakes, cookies and puddings t...
The citron melon is a relative of the watermelon botanically known as Citrullus lanatus var. citroides. A centuries old heirloom appearing in manuscripts in 1580, long grown for making preserves and sweetmeats that are used in fruitcakes, cookies and puddings through the winter. It is especially useful for fruit preserves, because it has a high pectin content. Hard rinds and firm flesh make Citron melons not an eating melon but rather storage melons. Fruits can be stored for up to a year. The citron rind is very hard and needs to be cut off. There are a great number of seeds and the flesh is hard so using a fork to remove the seeds is necessary. They are ancestors to domestic watermelons and grow wild in Africa. Easy to grow, disease resistant and drought tolerant. Also known as Citrullus caffer, Citrullus amarus, fodder melon for cattle feed, preserving melon, jam melon, pie melon, stock melon, Kalahari and tsamma melon. Tags: Harvest: Mid, Color: White, Size: Small, Shape: Round, Specialty: Heavy Producer, Specialty: Storage, Specialty: Disease Resistant, Specialty: Drought Tolerant, Heritage: Heirloom, Season: Summer.

The citron melon is native to Africa, probably the Kalahari desert, where it still grows abundantly. The time and place of its first domestication is unknown, but it appears to have been grown in ancient Egypt at least four thousand years ago. It is grown as food in Africa, especially dry or desert regions, including South Africa. In some areas, it is even used as a source of water during dry seasons. The citron melon should not be confused with actual citron, a citrus fruit originally used, since ancient Egypt, to repel insects. Delicious Citron Melon recipes.

Companions: potatoes
Inhibitors: tall growing vegetables

Learn More
HOW TO GROW CITRON MELON

Start indoors 3–4 weeks before last frost, plant out 2 weeks after last frost. Direct seed every 18” when soil is 70˚F. Store at 45˚F. Optimal temperature for plant growth is between 80-95˚F with nighttime temperatures above 70˚F. Water transplants more early on, sparingly as plants mature. Mulch to prevent weed competition. One beehive is suggested per acre for seedless varieties. The most commonly used signs of fruit maturity is to check if the tendril bearing the fruit has dried and withered or if the ground spot has turned a warm yellowish cream color. A number of seed growers give watermelon seed a 1 to 2 day fermentation period which helps free the seed from all endocarp material. Soil pH 6.5-7.5. Hardiness zones 4-9. Annual.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 195 seeds per ounce. Federal germination standard: 70%. Usual seed life: 6 years. Isolation distance for seed saving: 1/2 mile.

Planting Depth 1/2-1”
Soil Temp. Germ. 70-95˚F
Days to Germ. 3-8
Plant Spacing 2-3’
Row Spacing 6’
Days To Maturity 90–100
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained

Red Seeded Seed Count
1 Ounce ≈ 193 seeds
.25 Pound ≈ 771 seeds
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