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Natacha escarole

Chicorium endivia
HOW TO GROW ESCAROLE

Grow similar to lettuce. Start indoors 4-5 weeks before last frost, plant out 4 weeks before frost. For fall harvest, transplant 8–10 weeks before first frost. Spacing closely at 8-10" encourages these varieties' self-blanching characteristics. Blanching by excluding light for 10 to 20 days is done by covering with a pot with the hole covered, typing up heads or mound up earth. Plants should be kept dry while covered. Baby leaf maturities are from direct seeding. More tolerant of high temperatures than lettuce and can be grown from cool temperate areas to tropical lowlands. Endive is used as a substitute for lettuce in the tropics as it is more resistant to diseases. Soil pH 5.6-7.5. Hardiness zones 3. Biennial.

Average 15,750 seeds per ounce. Usual seed life: 5 years. Isolation distance for seed saving: 1/2 mile.

Planting Depth 1/4”
Soil Temp. Germ. 60˚F
Days to Germ. 7–15
Plant Spacing 10–12”
Row Spacing 16-18”
Days To Maturity 50
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained
  • Natacha escarole image####

  • 100 Seeds$4.70
  • 1000 Seeds$28.20
Big, heavy heads with abundant, tender leaves, and creamy, blanched hearts. Mild, slightly bitter flavor. Remarkable tolerance to bolting, tipburn, and resistance to bottom rot, even in hot weather. One of the most attractive escaroles. Similar to Eros but about a week later, less compact, and with lighter green lea...
Big, heavy heads with abundant, tender leaves, and creamy, blanched hearts. Mild, slightly bitter flavor. Remarkable tolerance to bolting, tipburn, and resistance to bottom rot, even in hot weather. One of the most attractive escaroles. Similar to Eros but about a week later, less compact, and with lighter green leaves. Tags: Color: Green, Shape: Sparse, Specialty: Cooking Green, Specialty: Heat Resistant, Season: Spring Fall Winter.

Escarole or endive was first brought into cultivation in the Eastern Mediterranean region and is native to Turkey and western Syria. It spread to central Europe in the 16th century. Endive belongs to the chicory genus, which includes several similar bitter leafed vegetables. Species include endive (Cichorium endivia), Cichorium pumilum and common chicory (Cichorium intybus). Common chicory includes chicory types such as radicchio, puntarelle, and Belgian endive. There is considerable confusion between Cichorium endivia and Cichorium intybus. Because of the name, endive is wrongly associated with Belgian endive which is a cultivated variety of common chicory. Endive is also a common name for some types of chicory (Cichorium intybus).

There are two main varieties of cultivated endive:

Curly endive or frisée (var crispum). This type has narrow, green, curly outer leaves. It is sometimes called chicory in the United States and is called chicorée frisée in French. Further confusion results from the fact that frisée also refers to a technique in which greens are lightly wilted with oil. Curly endive or frisée (var crispum). This type has narrow, green, curly outer leaves. It is sometimes called chicory in the United States and is called chicorée frisée in French. Further confusion results from the fact that frisée also refers to a technique in which greens are lightly wilted with oil.

Escarole or broad-leaved, endive (var latifolia) has broad, pale green leaves and is less bitter than the other varieties. Varieties or names include broad-leaved endive, Bavarian endive, Batavian endive, grumolo, scarola, and scarole. It is eaten like other greens, sauteed, chopped into soups and stews, or as part of a green salad. Delicious escarole recipes.

Learn More
  • Natacha escarole image####

Natacha escarole

Chicorium endivia
Big, heavy heads with abundant, tender leaves, and creamy, blanched hearts. Mild, slightly bitter flavor. Remarkable tolerance to bolting, tipburn, and resistance to bottom rot, even in hot weather. One of the most attractive escaroles. Similar to Eros but abou...
Big, heavy heads with abundant, tender leaves, and creamy, blanched hearts. Mild, slightly bitter flavor. Remarkable tolerance to bolting, tipburn, and resistance to bottom rot, even in hot weather. One of the most attractive escaroles. Similar to Eros but about a week later, less compact, and with lighter green leaves. Tags: Color: Green, Shape: Sparse, Specialty: Cooking Green, Specialty: Heat Resistant, Season: Spring Fall Winter.

Escarole or endive was first brought into cultivation in the Eastern Mediterranean region and is native to Turkey and western Syria. It spread to central Europe in the 16th century. Endive belongs to the chicory genus, which includes several similar bitter leafed vegetables. Species include endive (Cichorium endivia), Cichorium pumilum and common chicory (Cichorium intybus). Common chicory includes chicory types such as radicchio, puntarelle, and Belgian endive. There is considerable confusion between Cichorium endivia and Cichorium intybus. Because of the name, endive is wrongly associated with Belgian endive which is a cultivated variety of common chicory. Endive is also a common name for some types of chicory (Cichorium intybus).

There are two main varieties of cultivated endive:

Curly endive or frisée (var crispum). This type has narrow, green, curly outer leaves. It is sometimes called chicory in the United States and is called chicorée frisée in French. Further confusion results from the fact that frisée also refers to a technique in which greens are lightly wilted with oil. Curly endive or frisée (var crispum). This type has narrow, green, curly outer leaves. It is sometimes called chicory in the United States and is called chicorée frisée in French. Further confusion results from the fact that frisée also refers to a technique in which greens are lightly wilted with oil.

Escarole or broad-leaved, endive (var latifolia) has broad, pale green leaves and is less bitter than the other varieties. Varieties or names include broad-leaved endive, Bavarian endive, Batavian endive, grumolo, scarola, and scarole. It is eaten like other greens, sauteed, chopped into soups and stews, or as part of a green salad. Delicious escarole recipes.

Learn More
HOW TO GROW ESCAROLE

Grow similar to lettuce. Start indoors 4-5 weeks before last frost, plant out 4 weeks before frost. For fall harvest, transplant 8–10 weeks before first frost. Spacing closely at 8-10" encourages these varieties' self-blanching characteristics. Blanching by excluding light for 10 to 20 days is done by covering with a pot with the hole covered, typing up heads or mound up earth. Plants should be kept dry while covered. Baby leaf maturities are from direct seeding. More tolerant of high temperatures than lettuce and can be grown from cool temperate areas to tropical lowlands. Endive is used as a substitute for lettuce in the tropics as it is more resistant to diseases. Soil pH 5.6-7.5. Hardiness zones 3. Biennial.

Average 15,750 seeds per ounce. Usual seed life: 5 years. Isolation distance for seed saving: 1/2 mile.

Planting Depth 1/4”
Soil Temp. Germ. 60˚F
Days to Germ. 7–15
Plant Spacing 10–12”
Row Spacing 16-18”
Days To Maturity 50
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained
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