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150 Seeds

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Blue Speckled

Phaseolus acutifolius
HOW TO GROW TEPARY BEAN

Traditionally a two season bean, with the first planting being made in early spring and another in midsummer. Grows to 8–12”. The seeds should be planted two inches deep, eyes down and two to three inches apart with rows 18–24” from its neighbor. Tepary beans germinate about 10˚F warmer than common beans. It's best to cultivate your tepary patch regularly, to keep down weed competition. Grown as a dry shelled bean. Also tried as a dry climate cover crop. In the garden, dry on the vine and harvest the small kernels when they're orange brown. Farm production, when the first pods start to ripen whole plants are pulled up, dried and threshed. Soil pH 5–7. Hardiness zones 7–10. Annual.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 217 seeds per ounce. Usual seed life: 4 years.

Planting Depth 2"
Soil Temp. Germ. 70–95˚F
Days to Germ. 10–14
Plant Spacing 2–3”
Row Spacing 18–24”
Days To Maturity 80–90
Full Sun, Dry Climate
  • Blue Speckled tepary bean image##Photo: Ron Boyd##

    Photo: Ron Boyd

    📷
  • 50 Seeds$4.50
  • 500 Seeds$27.00
Tan and blue-grey spotted beans that were. They are drought and heat-tolerant and it is important not to over-irrigate them. They have evolved to mature quickly following monsoonal summer rains in the Southwest. From highland areas of southern Mexico, this variety is a Mayan folkrace. Blue Speckled does not tolerate...
Tan and blue-grey spotted beans that were. They are drought and heat-tolerant and it is important not to over-irrigate them. They have evolved to mature quickly following monsoonal summer rains in the Southwest. From highland areas of southern Mexico, this variety is a Mayan folkrace. Blue Speckled does not tolerate low-desert heat as O'odham varieties, but is otherwise very prolific. Seeds and pods are smaller than common beans and they have nutritional value. Its flavor is sweet and delicate, and the legume lends itself well to almost any bean recipe. Before cooking, let your teparies soak in cold water for at least 12 hours. After that time, the beans will have swollen to about twice their dried size. Tepary beans require more cooking time than do some other bean varieties. Also known as Pawi, Pavi, Tepari, Escomite, Yori mui, Yorimuni and Yori muni. Tags: Type: Pole, Harvest: Early, Color: Bi-Colored, Size: Small, Specialty: Drought Tolerant, Heritage: Heirloom.

The tepary bean is among North America's oldest agricultural crops: The naturally heat, drought and pest-resistant bean have been found dating to 5,000 BCE in the Tehuacán Valley in Mexico. It served as a staple food for generations of prehistoric native Americans. By 1701 it was the principal crop raised at the mission Nuestra Senora de los Dolores in New Mexico. In fact, it was there that the bean got the name, when the arriving Spanish asked a group of Papagos what they were planting, the Indians responded, "T'pawi, " meaning simply, "It's a bean." Papagos, Pimas and other tribes, still raise the bean. The Pimas sowed their teparies when the mesquite bushes leafed out and again when the saguaro was harvested.

Early native American’s used a digging stick, sow three to five seeds, three inches deep, in hills spaced six to eight feet apart. The Papagos often planted their teparies at the mouths of arroyos, waiting till after those gullies had been flooded with the early summer rains. These areas are usually moister than the open desert, and they're also rich in the nutrients and trace minerals washed down by the seasonal torrents. Papago women traditionally shelled the beans by beating the pods with sticks. The harvesters would then parch the kernels over live coals to destroy any insect eggs that might be present. You can accomplish the same thing by simply placing the beans, on a shallow baking pan, in a 180°F oven for 15 minutes or by freezing them for at least an hour.

Northwestern Mexico is the primary area of production for tepary beans. It is also cultivated in many countries in Africa, Australia and Asia

Delicious tepary bean recipes.

Learn More
  • Blue Speckled tepary bean image##Photo: Ron Boyd##

    Photo: Ron Boyd

    📷

Blue Speckled

Phaseolus acutifolius
Tan and blue-grey spotted beans that were. They are drought and heat-tolerant and it is important not to over-irrigate them. They have evolved to mature quickly following monsoonal summer rains in the Southwest. From highland areas of southern Mexico, this vari...
Tan and blue-grey spotted beans that were. They are drought and heat-tolerant and it is important not to over-irrigate them. They have evolved to mature quickly following monsoonal summer rains in the Southwest. From highland areas of southern Mexico, this variety is a Mayan folkrace. Blue Speckled does not tolerate low-desert heat as O'odham varieties, but is otherwise very prolific. Seeds and pods are smaller than common beans and they have nutritional value. Its flavor is sweet and delicate, and the legume lends itself well to almost any bean recipe. Before cooking, let your teparies soak in cold water for at least 12 hours. After that time, the beans will have swollen to about twice their dried size. Tepary beans require more cooking time than do some other bean varieties. Also known as Pawi, Pavi, Tepari, Escomite, Yori mui, Yorimuni and Yori muni. Tags: Type: Pole, Harvest: Early, Color: Bi-Colored, Size: Small, Specialty: Drought Tolerant, Heritage: Heirloom.

The tepary bean is among North America's oldest agricultural crops: The naturally heat, drought and pest-resistant bean have been found dating to 5,000 BCE in the Tehuacán Valley in Mexico. It served as a staple food for generations of prehistoric native Americans. By 1701 it was the principal crop raised at the mission Nuestra Senora de los Dolores in New Mexico. In fact, it was there that the bean got the name, when the arriving Spanish asked a group of Papagos what they were planting, the Indians responded, "T'pawi, " meaning simply, "It's a bean." Papagos, Pimas and other tribes, still raise the bean. The Pimas sowed their teparies when the mesquite bushes leafed out and again when the saguaro was harvested.

Early native American’s used a digging stick, sow three to five seeds, three inches deep, in hills spaced six to eight feet apart. The Papagos often planted their teparies at the mouths of arroyos, waiting till after those gullies had been flooded with the early summer rains. These areas are usually moister than the open desert, and they're also rich in the nutrients and trace minerals washed down by the seasonal torrents. Papago women traditionally shelled the beans by beating the pods with sticks. The harvesters would then parch the kernels over live coals to destroy any insect eggs that might be present. You can accomplish the same thing by simply placing the beans, on a shallow baking pan, in a 180°F oven for 15 minutes or by freezing them for at least an hour.

Northwestern Mexico is the primary area of production for tepary beans. It is also cultivated in many countries in Africa, Australia and Asia

Delicious tepary bean recipes.

Learn More
HOW TO GROW TEPARY BEAN

Traditionally a two season bean, with the first planting being made in early spring and another in midsummer. Grows to 8–12”. The seeds should be planted two inches deep, eyes down and two to three inches apart with rows 18–24” from its neighbor. Tepary beans germinate about 10˚F warmer than common beans. It's best to cultivate your tepary patch regularly, to keep down weed competition. Grown as a dry shelled bean. Also tried as a dry climate cover crop. In the garden, dry on the vine and harvest the small kernels when they're orange brown. Farm production, when the first pods start to ripen whole plants are pulled up, dried and threshed. Soil pH 5–7. Hardiness zones 7–10. Annual.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 217 seeds per ounce. Usual seed life: 4 years.

Planting Depth 2"
Soil Temp. Germ. 70–95˚F
Days to Germ. 10–14
Plant Spacing 2–3”
Row Spacing 18–24”
Days To Maturity 80–90
Full Sun, Dry Climate

Meet Your Farmer

We promote fair trade, organic practices and environmental responsibility throughout the Restoration Seeds supply chain. Below are the family farmers and seed suppliers who bring our open pollinated seeds to you.

Hobbs Family Farm Certified Organic by CO Dept. of Ag. Seed grower since 1996
Hobbs Family Farm is located in southeastern Colorado in one of the prime seed production regions of the world. The elevation of 4500', arid climate, hot days, cool nights, mineral rich soil, and clean irrigation water from the Rocky Mountains all contribute to exceptionally high quality seed. Hobbs Family Farm is a founding member of the Family Farmers Seed Cooperative. Also located along the historic Santa Fe trail, this farming region is a cultural crossroads, with strong Italian, Hispanic and Anglo farming traditions and unique seed varieties. The area is especially known for its Chilé peppers, onions, melons and watermelons. Dan and Jamie, and their three daughters, farm 30 acres of fresh vegetables and seeds in a five year rotation. The focus of their seed work is principally on onions, leeks, garlic, peppers, zucchini, melons, and carrots. They produce and select varieties for suitability for organic farming systems and specialty markets, drought and cold tolerance, and storage qualities. Hobbs Family Farm has been producing seed commercially since 1996 and is a founding member of the Family Farmers Seed Cooperative. Hobbs Family Farm is located in southeastern Colorado in one of the prime seed production regions of the world. The elevation of 4500', arid climate, hot days, cool nights, mineral rich soil, and clean irrigation water from the Rocky Mountains all contribute to exceptionally high quality seed.Also located along the historic Santa Fe trail, this farming region is a cultural cross-roads, with strong Italian, Hispanic and Anglo farming traditions and unique seed varieties. The area is especially known for its Chilé peppers, onions, melons and watermelons.Dan and Jamie, and their three daughters, farm 30 acres of fresh vegetables and seeds in a five year rotation. The focus of their seed work is principally on onions, leeks, garlic, peppers, zucchini, melons, and carrots. They produce and select varieties for suitability for organic farming systems and specialty markets, drought and cold tolerance, and storage qualities.

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