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BabyBeet

150 Seeds

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Blue Pepe nasturtium

Tropaeolum Majus
HOW TO GROW NASTURTIUM

Soak seeds in water for 12–24 hours before sowing. Direct sow outdoors two weeks before last frost or sow indoors 4–6 weeks before last frost then transplant out after last frost. Perennial climber up to 10’ but prefer to hang. Usually grown as an annual, frost tender and dislikes drought. Enjoys full sun to part shade. A good companion for many plants, keeping many harmful insects at bay and also improving the growth and flavor of neighboring crops including radishes, cabbages and fruit trees. Soil pH 6.1–7.8. Hardiness zones 11. Perennial.

Usual seed life 5 years.

Planting Depth 1/2"
Soil Temp. Germ. 60–65˚F
Days to Germ. 10–14
Plant Spacing 6-12”
Row Spacing 24”
Days To Maturity 60
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained Soil
  • Blue Pepe nasturtium image####

  • 25 Seeds$4.10
Specifically selected for baby leaf production. Small dark blue green leaves with a peppery flavor for salads. All parts of T. Majus are edible. The flower has most often been consumed, making for an especially ornamental salad ingredient. It has a slightly peppery taste reminiscent of watercress and is also used in...
Specifically selected for baby leaf production. Small dark blue green leaves with a peppery flavor for salads. All parts of T. Majus are edible. The flower has most often been consumed, making for an especially ornamental salad ingredient. It has a slightly peppery taste reminiscent of watercress and is also used in stir fry. Nasturtiums have been used in herbal medicine for their antiseptic and expectorant qualities. They are said to be good for chest colds and to promote the formation of new blood cells. T. majus has also been used in herbal medicine for urinary tract infections. Tags: Color: Blue Green.

Nasturtium, literally "nose-twister" or "nose-tweaker", was named by Carl Linnaeus because they produce an oil that is similar to that of watercress (Nasturtium officinale). First introduced into Europe in the 18th century and was named Tropaeolum minus by the Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus. He chose the genus name because the plant reminded him of an ancient custom. After victory in battle, the Romans set up a trophy pole called a tropaeum. On this the armor and weapons of the vanquished foe were hung. Linnaeus was reminded of this by the plant as the round leaves resembled shields and the flowers, blood-stained helmets. Nasturtiums were once known commonly as "Indian cresses" because they were introduced from the Americas, known popularly then as the Indies, and used like cress as salad ingredients. The 16th-century herbalist John Gerard called the plant "lark's heel" in his book Of the Historie of Plants.
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  • Blue Pepe nasturtium image####

Blue Pepe nasturtium

Tropaeolum Majus
Specifically selected for baby leaf production. Small dark blue green leaves with a peppery flavor for salads. All parts of T. Majus are edible. The flower has most often been consumed, making for an especially ornamental salad ingredient. It has a slightly pep...
Specifically selected for baby leaf production. Small dark blue green leaves with a peppery flavor for salads. All parts of T. Majus are edible. The flower has most often been consumed, making for an especially ornamental salad ingredient. It has a slightly peppery taste reminiscent of watercress and is also used in stir fry. Nasturtiums have been used in herbal medicine for their antiseptic and expectorant qualities. They are said to be good for chest colds and to promote the formation of new blood cells. T. majus has also been used in herbal medicine for urinary tract infections. Tags: Color: Blue Green.

Nasturtium, literally "nose-twister" or "nose-tweaker", was named by Carl Linnaeus because they produce an oil that is similar to that of watercress (Nasturtium officinale). First introduced into Europe in the 18th century and was named Tropaeolum minus by the Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus. He chose the genus name because the plant reminded him of an ancient custom. After victory in battle, the Romans set up a trophy pole called a tropaeum. On this the armor and weapons of the vanquished foe were hung. Linnaeus was reminded of this by the plant as the round leaves resembled shields and the flowers, blood-stained helmets. Nasturtiums were once known commonly as "Indian cresses" because they were introduced from the Americas, known popularly then as the Indies, and used like cress as salad ingredients. The 16th-century herbalist John Gerard called the plant "lark's heel" in his book Of the Historie of Plants.
Learn More
HOW TO GROW NASTURTIUM

Soak seeds in water for 12–24 hours before sowing. Direct sow outdoors two weeks before last frost or sow indoors 4–6 weeks before last frost then transplant out after last frost. Perennial climber up to 10’ but prefer to hang. Usually grown as an annual, frost tender and dislikes drought. Enjoys full sun to part shade. A good companion for many plants, keeping many harmful insects at bay and also improving the growth and flavor of neighboring crops including radishes, cabbages and fruit trees. Soil pH 6.1–7.8. Hardiness zones 11. Perennial.

Usual seed life 5 years.

Planting Depth 1/2"
Soil Temp. Germ. 60–65˚F
Days to Germ. 10–14
Plant Spacing 6-12”
Row Spacing 24”
Days To Maturity 60
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained Soil
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