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150 Seeds

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Birdsfoot Trefoil

Lotus corniculatus
HOW TO GROW BIRDSFOOT TREFOIL

SOWING
Sow April 15 to June 1. Early spring seeding is generally more successful than late summer seeding. Inoculation with the correct Rhizobia bacteria is required for effective nodulation Seedling growth rate is slower than alfalfa. Seedbed preparation is very important, similar to alfalfa. Weak seedling vigor is the major problem encountered when establishing stands. Because it has a relatively slow growth rate and small seed size, good seeing practices and weed control are essential. Birdsfoot trefoil should be seeded with grasses for optimum forage production. These grasses include: timothy, smooth brome, Orchardgrass, tall fescue, reed canarygrass and perennial ryegrass. The plant reproduces by seeds, and spreads laterally by stolons and rhizomes.

MANAGEMENT
Early spring or continuous grazing of birdsfoot trefoil will weaken and eliminate a stand. Rotational grazing should be used, allowing animals to graze when the first flowers appear. For use as pasture, this will allow two grazing periods on dryland pastures west of the Cascade Mountains or three grazing periods on irrigated land. If used as a combination of hay and pasture, a hay crop can be taken at early bloom in June and the re-growth grazed at first flower. On irrigated areas, two re-growths can be expected and can be used as hay or pasture. The third hay crop, or grazing period, can be expected in September. Leave 3 to 4 inches of top growth when grazing. Avoid haying or grazing between September 1st and the first killing frost to allow root reserves to accumulate for better winter survival and spring growth. Birdsfoot trefoil is persistent and has a long life when managed properly, up to 10 years.

ADAPTATION
Birdsfoot trefoil is adapted to the coastal areas west of the Cascade Range and from Minnesota and Iowa east to the New England states. It grows on many differing soil types, from sandy loams to clays. Alfalfa will out produce birdsfoot trefoil by 50 to 80 percent on well drained, fertile soils but is superior to alfalfa on soils of marginal fertility and production capabilities. For example, in areas of New York and Pennsylvania where alfalfa production is not optimal, trefoil may be a viable alternative in forage production systems. Its excellent grazing potential and bloat-free advantages make trefoil ideal for pasture. As a result, it is being grown more often in the northern United States and southern Canada, where production of other forage legumes is limited.

TOLERANCE
Minimum effective annual precipitation is 18” and is very winter hardy once established.

PESTS
Birdsfoot trefoil is relatively free of insect and disease damage, it is resistant to Phytophthora root rot and numerous alfalfa insects. It does not do well in the Southeast, where it is prone to root diseases.

SHIPPING COST
25-lb., 50-lb. and larger sizes ship via ground transportation. Select the appropriate Bulk Shipping option at checkout. We may email you additional shipping costs separately based on your total order weight, zone and palleting costs.

Soil pH 5.5-8.5. Hardiness zones 4–8. Perennial.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 360,000–390,000 seeds per pound. Sow average of 5–8 lbs per acre drilled, 2–5 lbs per acre in mixes. Usual seed life: 6–8 years.

Planting Depth 1/2"
Soil Temp. Germ. 68˚F
Days to Germ. 10–14 days
Plant Spacing 6–9.5”
Row Spacing 6–10”
Days To Maturity 90
Part Shade, Moist Well Drained

Birdsfoot Trefoil Seed Count
.25 Pound ≈ 94,500 seeds
1 Pound ≈ 378m seeds
5 Pounds ≈ 1,890m seeds
25 Pounds ≈ 9,450m seeds
  • birdsfoot trefoil image####

  • birdsfoot trefoil image##Photo: Albert Herring##

    Photo: Albert Herring

    📷
  • 1/4 Pound$4.29
  • 1 Pound$14.59
  • 5 Pounds$44.33
  • 25 Pounds$178.75

Long lived, deep rooted perennial forage legume is used for pasture, hay and silage. There are two types grown in the U.S., the European type and the Empire type. The Empire type is finer stemmed, more winter hardy for Canada and Minnesota, is 10 to 14 days later in flowering and has slower growth recovery rate a...

Long lived, deep rooted perennial forage legume is used for pasture, hay and silage. There are two types grown in the U.S., the European type and the Empire type. The Empire type is finer stemmed, more winter hardy for Canada and Minnesota, is 10 to 14 days later in flowering and has slower growth recovery rate after harvest. Mature height 12–30”.

The nutritive value equals that of alfalfa, and there is no apparent problem from bloat, even when pure stands are grazed. The European types grow faster and can be harvested two and sometimes three times per year. Minimum cutting heights are from 3 to 4.5 inches to protect the buds from which new growth occurs. One of our favorite permaculture cover crops. Also see New Zealand white clover. The name 'bird's foot' refers to the appearance of the seed pods on their stalk. Also known as broadleaf trefoil and in Britain as eggs and bacon.

Tags: Color: Yellow, Size: Short.

Lotus corniculatus is a common flowering plant in the pea family Fabaceae, native to grassland in temperate Eurasia and North Africa and introduced to the U.S. and Canada for erosion control and livestock forage.
Learn More
  • birdsfoot trefoil image####

  • birdsfoot trefoil image##Photo: Albert Herring##

    Photo: Albert Herring

    📷

Birdsfoot Trefoil

Lotus corniculatus

Long lived, deep rooted perennial forage legume is used for pasture, hay and silage. There are two types grown in the U.S., the European type and the Empire type. The Empire type is finer stemmed, more winter hardy for Canada and Minnesota, is 10 to 14 days ...

Long lived, deep rooted perennial forage legume is used for pasture, hay and silage. There are two types grown in the U.S., the European type and the Empire type. The Empire type is finer stemmed, more winter hardy for Canada and Minnesota, is 10 to 14 days later in flowering and has slower growth recovery rate after harvest. Mature height 12–30”.

The nutritive value equals that of alfalfa, and there is no apparent problem from bloat, even when pure stands are grazed. The European types grow faster and can be harvested two and sometimes three times per year. Minimum cutting heights are from 3 to 4.5 inches to protect the buds from which new growth occurs. One of our favorite permaculture cover crops. Also see New Zealand white clover. The name 'bird's foot' refers to the appearance of the seed pods on their stalk. Also known as broadleaf trefoil and in Britain as eggs and bacon.

Tags: Color: Yellow, Size: Short.

Lotus corniculatus is a common flowering plant in the pea family Fabaceae, native to grassland in temperate Eurasia and North Africa and introduced to the U.S. and Canada for erosion control and livestock forage.
Learn More
HOW TO GROW BIRDSFOOT TREFOIL

SOWING
Sow April 15 to June 1. Early spring seeding is generally more successful than late summer seeding. Inoculation with the correct Rhizobia bacteria is required for effective nodulation Seedling growth rate is slower than alfalfa. Seedbed preparation is very important, similar to alfalfa. Weak seedling vigor is the major problem encountered when establishing stands. Because it has a relatively slow growth rate and small seed size, good seeing practices and weed control are essential. Birdsfoot trefoil should be seeded with grasses for optimum forage production. These grasses include: timothy, smooth brome, Orchardgrass, tall fescue, reed canarygrass and perennial ryegrass. The plant reproduces by seeds, and spreads laterally by stolons and rhizomes.

MANAGEMENT
Early spring or continuous grazing of birdsfoot trefoil will weaken and eliminate a stand. Rotational grazing should be used, allowing animals to graze when the first flowers appear. For use as pasture, this will allow two grazing periods on dryland pastures west of the Cascade Mountains or three grazing periods on irrigated land. If used as a combination of hay and pasture, a hay crop can be taken at early bloom in June and the re-growth grazed at first flower. On irrigated areas, two re-growths can be expected and can be used as hay or pasture. The third hay crop, or grazing period, can be expected in September. Leave 3 to 4 inches of top growth when grazing. Avoid haying or grazing between September 1st and the first killing frost to allow root reserves to accumulate for better winter survival and spring growth. Birdsfoot trefoil is persistent and has a long life when managed properly, up to 10 years.

ADAPTATION
Birdsfoot trefoil is adapted to the coastal areas west of the Cascade Range and from Minnesota and Iowa east to the New England states. It grows on many differing soil types, from sandy loams to clays. Alfalfa will out produce birdsfoot trefoil by 50 to 80 percent on well drained, fertile soils but is superior to alfalfa on soils of marginal fertility and production capabilities. For example, in areas of New York and Pennsylvania where alfalfa production is not optimal, trefoil may be a viable alternative in forage production systems. Its excellent grazing potential and bloat-free advantages make trefoil ideal for pasture. As a result, it is being grown more often in the northern United States and southern Canada, where production of other forage legumes is limited.

TOLERANCE
Minimum effective annual precipitation is 18” and is very winter hardy once established.

PESTS
Birdsfoot trefoil is relatively free of insect and disease damage, it is resistant to Phytophthora root rot and numerous alfalfa insects. It does not do well in the Southeast, where it is prone to root diseases.

SHIPPING COST
25-lb., 50-lb. and larger sizes ship via ground transportation. Select the appropriate Bulk Shipping option at checkout. We may email you additional shipping costs separately based on your total order weight, zone and palleting costs.

Soil pH 5.5-8.5. Hardiness zones 4–8. Perennial.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 360,000–390,000 seeds per pound. Sow average of 5–8 lbs per acre drilled, 2–5 lbs per acre in mixes. Usual seed life: 6–8 years.

Planting Depth 1/2"
Soil Temp. Germ. 68˚F
Days to Germ. 10–14 days
Plant Spacing 6–9.5”
Row Spacing 6–10”
Days To Maturity 90
Part Shade, Moist Well Drained

Birdsfoot Trefoil Seed Count
.25 Pound ≈ 94,500 seeds
1 Pound ≈ 378m seeds
5 Pounds ≈ 1,890m seeds
25 Pounds ≈ 9,450m seeds
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