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150 Seeds

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Arrowleaf Clover

Trifolium vesiculosum
HOW TO GROW ARROWLEAF CLOVER

SOWING
Best results are obtained by planting on prepared seedbeds in the fall at the accustomed season for seeding winter legumes. Arrowleaf clover is established by seed from September to mid-October. In milder climates, Sow August 15 to November 1. Seed can be drilled at 5–8 lbs per acre or broadcast at 15 lbs per acre with proper inoculant. Arrowleaf clover thrives on well drained sandy and clay soils, but is less tolerant of acid soils and low fertility than crimson clover. It does not tolerate alkaline soils or poor drainage.

MANAGEMENT
Arrowleaf clover will continue to develop new leaves and remain productive longer in the spring when grazed to a height of 2 to 4 inches. If managed for a hay crop, clover should be grazed until early- to mid-April, and then harvested at early to mid-bloom in May. If Arrowleaf clover is seeded in a mix with short-cycle annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), use a low doses of grass seed to avoid excessive competition for grazing during the winter. In areas with high rainfall it is recommended planting a perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), given that it would be less competitive. Winter production can be increased by the presence of the grass and the clover makes an excellent late contribution in the spring until the beginning of winter.

PESTS
Arrowleaf clover is susceptible to crown rot (Schlerotinia trifolium). Damage to from alfalfa weevils and aphids has also been observed.

SHIPPING COST
25-lb., 50-lb. and larger sizes ship via ground transportation. Select the appropriate Bulk Shipping option at checkout. We may email you additional shipping costs separately based on your total order weight, zone and palleting costs.

Soil pH 6.0–7. Hardiness zones 3–8. Annual.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 350,000 to 400,000 seeds per pound. Sow average of 5–8 lbs per acre. Usual seed life: 6–8 years.

Planting Depth 1/4"
Soil Temp. Germ. 60–68˚F
Days to Germ. 7–10
Plant Spacing 6–9.5”
Row Spacing 6–10”
Days To Maturity 130–150
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained Soil

Arrowleaf Clover Seed Count
1 Pound ≈ 378m seeds
5 Pounds ≈ 1,890m seeds
25 Pounds ≈ 9,450m seeds
50 Pounds ≈ 18,900m seeds
100 Pounds ≈ 37,799m seeds
  • 1 Pound$9.95
  • 5 Pounds$25.52
  • 25 Pounds$99.69
  • 50 Pounds$177.19
  • 100 Pounds$398.75

Arrowleaf clover is the most important annual clover cultivated in the USA, covered 2.5 times as many hectares as the crimson clover, which is the second most important species in the country. It is a cool season, reseeding annual legume used there mainly as winter pasture and cover crop. It is a multiple purpose...

Arrowleaf clover is the most important annual clover cultivated in the USA, covered 2.5 times as many hectares as the crimson clover, which is the second most important species in the country. It is a cool season, reseeding annual legume used there mainly as winter pasture and cover crop. It is a multiple purpose plant material that can be used for grazing, hay production, a wildlife food source, soil improvement and a winter cover crop. Will provide about 100 lb. nitrogen per acre. Forage quality is high with digestibility generally superior to crimson clover at all stages of maturity. Arrowleaf is not liked by horses, is relished by cattle, deer, turkey and most other grazers. Commonly planted with ryegrass or small grains for spring forage.

Grows to 24–60”. Arrowleaf clover has a long productive season, six to eight weeks longer in the spring than Crimson clover. Like crimson, Arrowleaf is planted in the fall but Arrowleaf clover seed is harvested later, in August and early September. Also like Crimson, the flowers bloom from bottom to top, and the flower head will continue to grow taller and produce more seed as long as growing conditions are good. The flower head is initially white, later turning pink to purple, flowers for 1–2 months. Expected yields of Arrowleaf clover seed are about 800 pounds per acre. Hard seed percentage is high and there is a lower incidence of bloat. The thick, hallow stems are often purple. One cutting of excellent quality hay can be make in May if grazing is stopped by early April.

One of its main characteristics is a taproot system 5’ (1.5 m) which allows to extract nutrients and water from deeper soil layers, extending its growth period and allowing it to remain green for longer than any other annual pasture species or traditional legumes. The roots of the Arrowleaf clover extend 20 to 25% deeper than the roots of the subterranean clover, reaching a depth of 2.5–5’ (0.8 to 1.5 m). Our variety is Yuchi Arrowleaf Clover.

Tags: Color: White, Size: Large, Specialty: Cover Crop, Specialty: Drought Tolerant, Season: Spring Fall.

The arrowleaf clover is an annual legume, originating from the Balkan Peninsula, the Crimea and the Caucus. It is currently distributed over a much wider area in Europe and western Asia, in countries such as Greece, Turkey, the Ukraine and southern Russia. It is widely adapted from southern Tennessee to the Florida panhandle and from east Texas to the Carolinas. It can also be grown in humid areas in Washington, Oregon, and northern California from bulk clover seeds.
Learn More

Arrowleaf Clover

Trifolium vesiculosum

Arrowleaf clover is the most important annual clover cultivated in the USA, covered 2.5 times as many hectares as the crimson clover, which is the second most important species in the country. It is a cool season, reseeding annual legume used there mainly as...

Arrowleaf clover is the most important annual clover cultivated in the USA, covered 2.5 times as many hectares as the crimson clover, which is the second most important species in the country. It is a cool season, reseeding annual legume used there mainly as winter pasture and cover crop. It is a multiple purpose plant material that can be used for grazing, hay production, a wildlife food source, soil improvement and a winter cover crop. Will provide about 100 lb. nitrogen per acre. Forage quality is high with digestibility generally superior to crimson clover at all stages of maturity. Arrowleaf is not liked by horses, is relished by cattle, deer, turkey and most other grazers. Commonly planted with ryegrass or small grains for spring forage.

Grows to 24–60”. Arrowleaf clover has a long productive season, six to eight weeks longer in the spring than Crimson clover. Like crimson, Arrowleaf is planted in the fall but Arrowleaf clover seed is harvested later, in August and early September. Also like Crimson, the flowers bloom from bottom to top, and the flower head will continue to grow taller and produce more seed as long as growing conditions are good. The flower head is initially white, later turning pink to purple, flowers for 1–2 months. Expected yields of Arrowleaf clover seed are about 800 pounds per acre. Hard seed percentage is high and there is a lower incidence of bloat. The thick, hallow stems are often purple. One cutting of excellent quality hay can be make in May if grazing is stopped by early April.

One of its main characteristics is a taproot system 5’ (1.5 m) which allows to extract nutrients and water from deeper soil layers, extending its growth period and allowing it to remain green for longer than any other annual pasture species or traditional legumes. The roots of the Arrowleaf clover extend 20 to 25% deeper than the roots of the subterranean clover, reaching a depth of 2.5–5’ (0.8 to 1.5 m). Our variety is Yuchi Arrowleaf Clover.

Tags: Color: White, Size: Large, Specialty: Cover Crop, Specialty: Drought Tolerant, Season: Spring Fall.

The arrowleaf clover is an annual legume, originating from the Balkan Peninsula, the Crimea and the Caucus. It is currently distributed over a much wider area in Europe and western Asia, in countries such as Greece, Turkey, the Ukraine and southern Russia. It is widely adapted from southern Tennessee to the Florida panhandle and from east Texas to the Carolinas. It can also be grown in humid areas in Washington, Oregon, and northern California from bulk clover seeds.
Learn More
HOW TO GROW ARROWLEAF CLOVER

SOWING
Best results are obtained by planting on prepared seedbeds in the fall at the accustomed season for seeding winter legumes. Arrowleaf clover is established by seed from September to mid-October. In milder climates, Sow August 15 to November 1. Seed can be drilled at 5–8 lbs per acre or broadcast at 15 lbs per acre with proper inoculant. Arrowleaf clover thrives on well drained sandy and clay soils, but is less tolerant of acid soils and low fertility than crimson clover. It does not tolerate alkaline soils or poor drainage.

MANAGEMENT
Arrowleaf clover will continue to develop new leaves and remain productive longer in the spring when grazed to a height of 2 to 4 inches. If managed for a hay crop, clover should be grazed until early- to mid-April, and then harvested at early to mid-bloom in May. If Arrowleaf clover is seeded in a mix with short-cycle annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), use a low doses of grass seed to avoid excessive competition for grazing during the winter. In areas with high rainfall it is recommended planting a perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), given that it would be less competitive. Winter production can be increased by the presence of the grass and the clover makes an excellent late contribution in the spring until the beginning of winter.

PESTS
Arrowleaf clover is susceptible to crown rot (Schlerotinia trifolium). Damage to from alfalfa weevils and aphids has also been observed.

SHIPPING COST
25-lb., 50-lb. and larger sizes ship via ground transportation. Select the appropriate Bulk Shipping option at checkout. We may email you additional shipping costs separately based on your total order weight, zone and palleting costs.

Soil pH 6.0–7. Hardiness zones 3–8. Annual.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 350,000 to 400,000 seeds per pound. Sow average of 5–8 lbs per acre. Usual seed life: 6–8 years.

Planting Depth 1/4"
Soil Temp. Germ. 60–68˚F
Days to Germ. 7–10
Plant Spacing 6–9.5”
Row Spacing 6–10”
Days To Maturity 130–150
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained Soil

Arrowleaf Clover Seed Count
1 Pound ≈ 378m seeds
5 Pounds ≈ 1,890m seeds
25 Pounds ≈ 9,450m seeds
50 Pounds ≈ 18,900m seeds
100 Pounds ≈ 37,799m seeds
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