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150 Seeds

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Adzuki Bean

Phaseolus v. angularis
HOW TO GROW ADZUKI BEAN

Direct sow after last frost when soil tempt is about 70˚F usually late May. Slow to emerge in cool soils 50–55˚F. Sow pole beans from late spring to very early summer. Sow pole beans 3 seeds per hole, 8” between hole and trellis rows 4’ spacing. Thin to 3–6” apart. Adzuki beans are susceptible to white mold and bacterial stem rot. Avoid wetting foliage, remove plants at the end of the year, practice 4 year crop rotation. Shattering of pods is common, so care is needed to prevent large harvest losses. Delaying harvest until late in the season or late in the day will likely increase harvest losses. Soil pH 5.8–6.4. Hardiness zones 5-13. Annual.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 313 seeds per ounce. Isolation distance for seed saving: 1/2 mile.

Planting Depth 1-2”
Soil Temp. Germ. 70-95˚F
Days to Germ. 10–14
Plant Spacing 3–6”
Row Spacing 4’
Days To Maturity 110-120
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained
  • adzuki bean image####

  • 200 Seeds$4.25
  • 2000 Seeds$25.50
Popular throughout Asia, petite, ruby red Adzuki beans are often served with rice. For a simple and tasty dish combine beans with sushi rice and a sprinkling of sesame salt. Enjoy as a kid-friendly after-school snack or vegetarian main course wrapped in toasted nori seaweed. In East Asian cuisine, Adzuki beana are c...
Popular throughout Asia, petite, ruby red Adzuki beans are often served with rice. For a simple and tasty dish combine beans with sushi rice and a sprinkling of sesame salt. Enjoy as a kid-friendly after-school snack or vegetarian main course wrapped in toasted nori seaweed. In East Asian cuisine, Adzuki beana are commonly eaten sweetened. In particular, it is often boiled with sugar, resulting in red bean paste (an), a very common ingredient in all of these cuisines espcially deserts. It is also common to add flavoring to the bean paste, such as chestnut. The beans make a delicious sweet-rice-and-bean dessert dumpling. They also make good ice cream, and are the flavoring in Red Bean ice cream.

High in magnesium, potassium, zinc and folic acid. Adzuki, Vigna angularis is cousin to the Corkscrew Vine, Vigna caracalla and Snail Vine, Vigna Phaseolus caracalla. Unlike it’s cousins, it flowers very early. The leaves are like the caracalla and phaseolus, but about 2 to 3 times larger. Also known as Field Pea, Yellow Snail Vine or Red Bean in China. Tags: Type: Indeterminate, Harvest: Late, Color: Red, Size: Small, Season: Summer.

Annual vine widely grown throughout East Asia and the Himalayas for its small bean. Adzuki bean first became domesticated in East Asia and later crossbred with native species in the Himalayas. The earliest known archaeological evidence of the bean comes from the Awazu-kotei Ruin in Shiga prefecture of the Japanese mid-Jōmon period of 4000 BC and later occurs commonly in many Jomon sites of between 4000 BC and 2000 BC in Japan. The name Adzuki is a translation of the native Japanese name. Delicious bean recipes.

Companions All: celery, corn, squash
Bush: cucumbers, strawberries
Lima: locust trees
Pole: radish
Inhibitors All: onions
Pole: kohlrabi, sunflowers

Learn More
  • adzuki bean image####

Adzuki Bean

Phaseolus v. angularis
Popular throughout Asia, petite, ruby red Adzuki beans are often served with rice. For a simple and tasty dish combine beans with sushi rice and a sprinkling of sesame salt. Enjoy as a kid-friendly after-school snack or vegetarian main course wrapped in toasted...
Popular throughout Asia, petite, ruby red Adzuki beans are often served with rice. For a simple and tasty dish combine beans with sushi rice and a sprinkling of sesame salt. Enjoy as a kid-friendly after-school snack or vegetarian main course wrapped in toasted nori seaweed. In East Asian cuisine, Adzuki beana are commonly eaten sweetened. In particular, it is often boiled with sugar, resulting in red bean paste (an), a very common ingredient in all of these cuisines espcially deserts. It is also common to add flavoring to the bean paste, such as chestnut. The beans make a delicious sweet-rice-and-bean dessert dumpling. They also make good ice cream, and are the flavoring in Red Bean ice cream.

High in magnesium, potassium, zinc and folic acid. Adzuki, Vigna angularis is cousin to the Corkscrew Vine, Vigna caracalla and Snail Vine, Vigna Phaseolus caracalla. Unlike it’s cousins, it flowers very early. The leaves are like the caracalla and phaseolus, but about 2 to 3 times larger. Also known as Field Pea, Yellow Snail Vine or Red Bean in China. Tags: Type: Indeterminate, Harvest: Late, Color: Red, Size: Small, Season: Summer.

Annual vine widely grown throughout East Asia and the Himalayas for its small bean. Adzuki bean first became domesticated in East Asia and later crossbred with native species in the Himalayas. The earliest known archaeological evidence of the bean comes from the Awazu-kotei Ruin in Shiga prefecture of the Japanese mid-Jōmon period of 4000 BC and later occurs commonly in many Jomon sites of between 4000 BC and 2000 BC in Japan. The name Adzuki is a translation of the native Japanese name. Delicious bean recipes.

Companions All: celery, corn, squash
Bush: cucumbers, strawberries
Lima: locust trees
Pole: radish
Inhibitors All: onions
Pole: kohlrabi, sunflowers

Learn More
HOW TO GROW ADZUKI BEAN

Direct sow after last frost when soil tempt is about 70˚F usually late May. Slow to emerge in cool soils 50–55˚F. Sow pole beans from late spring to very early summer. Sow pole beans 3 seeds per hole, 8” between hole and trellis rows 4’ spacing. Thin to 3–6” apart. Adzuki beans are susceptible to white mold and bacterial stem rot. Avoid wetting foliage, remove plants at the end of the year, practice 4 year crop rotation. Shattering of pods is common, so care is needed to prevent large harvest losses. Delaying harvest until late in the season or late in the day will likely increase harvest losses. Soil pH 5.8–6.4. Hardiness zones 5-13. Annual.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 313 seeds per ounce. Isolation distance for seed saving: 1/2 mile.

Planting Depth 1-2”
Soil Temp. Germ. 70-95˚F
Days to Germ. 10–14
Plant Spacing 3–6”
Row Spacing 4’
Days To Maturity 110-120
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained
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