Added to Cart

BabyBeet

150 Seeds

Qty: 1 - $3.50

Something goes here
 
 

SEED CALCULATOR

US Imperial
Metric
Direct Sow
Transplant
=

Number of Plants 0

Weight 0 oz

at 0 seeds per foot

SEED CALCULATOR

US Imperial
Metric
=

Number of Seeds: 0

Seeds per 100 feet: 0

Peace alexanders

Smyrnium olusatrum
HOW TO GROW ALEXANDERS

Direct seed in fall or early spring in nursery bed. If blanching to sweeten and tenderize leaves and stems, cover in fall with bucket. Flowers the second year. Grown as biennial, perennial in favorable zones. If saving seed, rub the black husk off the large seed to germinate. Let stem go to seed to self-sow. Tolerates maritime exposure. Soil pH 6.1-7.8. Hardiness zones 6-9. Biennial.

Usual seed life: 8–10 years.

Planting Depth 1/4"
Soil Temp. Germ. 60–70
Days to Germ. 4-6 weeks
Plant Spacing 2’
Row Spacing 3-4’
Days To Maturity 150
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained Soil
  • Peace alexanders image####

  • 20 Seeds$4.70
  • 200 Seeds$28.20

All parts of the plant are edible, indeterminate in flavor between celery and parsley. Was once used in many dishes but has been replaced by celery. Leaves can be substituted for parsley. Stems and roots can replace celery in soups and salads. Spicy seeds can be used like pepper. Common among sites of medieval mo...

All parts of the plant are edible, indeterminate in flavor between celery and parsley. Was once used in many dishes but has been replaced by celery. Leaves can be substituted for parsley. Stems and roots can replace celery in soups and salads. Spicy seeds can be used like pepper. Common among sites of medieval monastery gardens and on Eurpean cliff paths, first seaside greener of the year. Plant is bitter and digestive. Fortifying tonic, used in the past to treat asthma, menstrual problems and wounds. Feedstuff much also appreciated by horses. Also known as alisanders, horse parsley and smyrnium.

Our selection is from Dr. Alan Kapuler of Peace Seeds in Corvallis, Oregon. Alan, describes his experience with Alexanders, “It took awhile for this European species to germinate and adapt to our shady, moist, PNW valley yard. Then a few years ago some nice large green plants flourished in January to March before much else was really thriving. The next year, 1/4 of the yard was occupied by Alexander's. Turns out that the compost pile needs fresh green during the late winter and early spring. Alexander's is a prime ally for compost making, fertility enhancement and tasty spring greens for soup and salad.”

Large black seeds produce vigorous seedlings, and will naturalize easily if integrated into a hedgerow polyculture. A good candidate for further domestication into a winter vegetable, more hardy than parsley.

Tags: Color: Green, Certification: Organic.

Native to the Mediterranean, Syria and Canary Islands. Thrives further north. Brought to Britain by the Romans. Known to Pliny the Elder. Ancient potherb named for Alexander the Great. Named Smyrnion for Aromatic smell and favor similar to myrrh. Columella, the most important agricultural writer of the Roman empire, AD 4–70, described consumption of the roots, "Before Alexanders puts out stems, pull up its root in January or February and, after shaking it gently to remove any soil, place it in vinegar and salt; after 30 days, take it out and peel off its skin; otherwise, place its chopped pith into a new glass container or jar and add juice to it as described below. Take some mint, raisins and a small dry onion and grind them together with toasted wheat and a little honey; when all this is well ground, mix with it two parts of syrup and one of vinegar and put it like this into the aforementioned jar and, after covering it with a lid, place a skin over it; later, when you wish to use it, remove the pieces of root with their own juice and add oil to them." Columella describes cultivation, "alexanders must be grown from seed in ground dug out with a pastino, particularly close to walls because it likes shade and thrives on any kind of ground: so once you have sown it, if you do not uproot it fully but leave its stems for seed instead, it lasts forever and requires only light hoeing. It is sown from the feast day of Vulcan (August) until the calends of September, but also in January..."
Learn More
  • Peace alexanders image####

Peace alexanders

Smyrnium olusatrum

All parts of the plant are edible, indeterminate in flavor between celery and parsley. Was once used in many dishes but has been replaced by celery. Leaves can be substituted for parsley. Stems and roots can replace celery in soups and salads. Spicy seeds ca...

All parts of the plant are edible, indeterminate in flavor between celery and parsley. Was once used in many dishes but has been replaced by celery. Leaves can be substituted for parsley. Stems and roots can replace celery in soups and salads. Spicy seeds can be used like pepper. Common among sites of medieval monastery gardens and on Eurpean cliff paths, first seaside greener of the year. Plant is bitter and digestive. Fortifying tonic, used in the past to treat asthma, menstrual problems and wounds. Feedstuff much also appreciated by horses. Also known as alisanders, horse parsley and smyrnium.

Our selection is from Dr. Alan Kapuler of Peace Seeds in Corvallis, Oregon. Alan, describes his experience with Alexanders, “It took awhile for this European species to germinate and adapt to our shady, moist, PNW valley yard. Then a few years ago some nice large green plants flourished in January to March before much else was really thriving. The next year, 1/4 of the yard was occupied by Alexander's. Turns out that the compost pile needs fresh green during the late winter and early spring. Alexander's is a prime ally for compost making, fertility enhancement and tasty spring greens for soup and salad.”

Large black seeds produce vigorous seedlings, and will naturalize easily if integrated into a hedgerow polyculture. A good candidate for further domestication into a winter vegetable, more hardy than parsley.

Tags: Color: Green, Certification: Organic.

Native to the Mediterranean, Syria and Canary Islands. Thrives further north. Brought to Britain by the Romans. Known to Pliny the Elder. Ancient potherb named for Alexander the Great. Named Smyrnion for Aromatic smell and favor similar to myrrh. Columella, the most important agricultural writer of the Roman empire, AD 4–70, described consumption of the roots, "Before Alexanders puts out stems, pull up its root in January or February and, after shaking it gently to remove any soil, place it in vinegar and salt; after 30 days, take it out and peel off its skin; otherwise, place its chopped pith into a new glass container or jar and add juice to it as described below. Take some mint, raisins and a small dry onion and grind them together with toasted wheat and a little honey; when all this is well ground, mix with it two parts of syrup and one of vinegar and put it like this into the aforementioned jar and, after covering it with a lid, place a skin over it; later, when you wish to use it, remove the pieces of root with their own juice and add oil to them." Columella describes cultivation, "alexanders must be grown from seed in ground dug out with a pastino, particularly close to walls because it likes shade and thrives on any kind of ground: so once you have sown it, if you do not uproot it fully but leave its stems for seed instead, it lasts forever and requires only light hoeing. It is sown from the feast day of Vulcan (August) until the calends of September, but also in January..."
Learn More
HOW TO GROW ALEXANDERS

Direct seed in fall or early spring in nursery bed. If blanching to sweeten and tenderize leaves and stems, cover in fall with bucket. Flowers the second year. Grown as biennial, perennial in favorable zones. If saving seed, rub the black husk off the large seed to germinate. Let stem go to seed to self-sow. Tolerates maritime exposure. Soil pH 6.1-7.8. Hardiness zones 6-9. Biennial.

Usual seed life: 8–10 years.

Planting Depth 1/4"
Soil Temp. Germ. 60–70
Days to Germ. 4-6 weeks
Plant Spacing 2’
Row Spacing 3-4’
Days To Maturity 150
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained Soil

Meet Your Farmer

We promote fair trade, organic practices and environmental responsibility throughout the Restoration Seeds supply chain. Below are the family farmers and seed suppliers who bring our open pollinated seeds to you.

Peace Seeds Conventional Seed grower since 1973
Dr. Kapuler is founder of Peace Seeds. At age 16 he entered Yale, the youngest student in his class of 1,000 and graduated first in his class. His undergraduate honors thesis earned him the highest grade Yale had ever bestowed and was eventually published in the Journal of Molecular Biology. After earning his doctorate in molecular biology at prestigious Rockefeller University he worked with world expert on nucleic acids A.M. Michelson and apprenticed at the lab of future Nobel Prize winner Howard Temin. Alan and Linda Kapuler have been organic growers since 1973.
Reviews
How can we help you?

Inquiry

First Name*
Last Name*
Company
Email*
How much seed do you need by when?*
(Captcha) How much is:

Answer:*

* Designates required field. Seed Inquires only please!