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150 Seeds

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Camassia quamash

Camassia quamash
HOW TO GROW CAMASSIA QUAMASH

Cold stratify seeds for 42–100 days at 34–41ºF (1-5ºC). Or, sow in 15 cm deep trays or pots in the fall to break dormancy naturally. Seedlings require moisture through the spring growing period. The bulb grows best in well-drained soil high in humus. It will grow in lightly shaded forest areas, on rocky outcrops, in open meadows, prairies, alongside streams and rivers. The plants may be divided in autumn after the leaves have withered. Plant outdoors in the fall or early winter for best root development. Seedlings prefer cool temps, 1–2” or organic mulch covering and little weed competition the first season. Late summer burning can promote the vigor. The plant spreads by seed. Soil pH 5.1-7.8. Hardiness zones 4–7. Perennial.

Average 7,300 seeds per ounce, average 116,900 seeds per pound. Usual seed life 3–5 years.

Planting Depth 1/4"
Soil Temp. Germ. 39–40ºF stratify
Days to Germ. 2–4 months
Plant Spacing 3–4” to 6–8”
Row Spacing 6–12”
Days To Maturity 2–5 years
Full Sun, Wet Climate
  • camassia quamash image##Photo: Walter Siegmund##

    Photo: Walter Siegmund

    📷
  • camassia quamash image##Photo: Walter Siegmund##

    Photo: Walter Siegmund

    📷
  • camassia quamash image##Photo: Ben Cody##

    Photo: Ben Cody

    📷
  • camassia quamash image##Sunrise at Camas Prairie Centennial Park. Photo: Charles Knowles##

    Sunrise at Camas Prairie Centennial Park. Photo: Charles Knowles

    📷
  • camassia quamash image##Camas meadow near Bovill, Idaho. Photo: Robbiegiles##

    Camas meadow near Bovill, Idaho. Photo: Robbiegiles

    📷
  • 50 Seeds$4.70
  • 500 Seeds$28.20

Deep purple-blue five pedal flowers appear in late spring to early summer, grows to 1’ (0.3 m). This bulbflower naturalizes well in gardens. Keep 15 cm deep flats in semi-shaded location. This will form a sod or turf which can be cut up and placed in gardens, meadow planting or landscaping.

The egg-shaped b...

Deep purple-blue five pedal flowers appear in late spring to early summer, grows to 1’ (0.3 m). This bulbflower naturalizes well in gardens. Keep 15 cm deep flats in semi-shaded location. This will form a sod or turf which can be cut up and placed in gardens, meadow planting or landscaping.

The egg-shaped bulbs, 2–4 cm long, were harvested in the autumn, once the flowers have withered, then pit-roasted or boiled by women of the Nez Perce, Cree and Blackfoot tribes. A pit-cooked camas bulb looks and tastes something like baked sweet potato, but sweeter, and with more crystalline fibers due to the presence of inulin in the bulbs. People have also dried the bulbs to then be pounded into flour. In 1998, Gurusiddiah and Kapuler analyzed the juice of a camas bulb and found 15/20 amino acids used in protein synthesis in the juice. The highest amounts were, in descending order, arginine, cysteine, threonine, isoleucine, aspartic acid, tyrosine, serine and histidine. In comparison with other vegetables, the camas is unusually high in some of the rarer amino acids needed by our bodies for making proteins. Also known as camas, small camas, common camas, camash, quamash and Camas Hyacinth, minor.

Tags: Color: Purple, Heritage: Heirloom, Season: Spring Fall, Seed: Safe Seed Pledge.

Native to western North America in large areas of southern Canada and the northwestern United States, from British Columbia and Alberta to California and east from Washington state to Montana and Wyoming. The genus name comes from the Nez Perce Indian name for this plant, and means "sweet". Qém’es, a term for the plant's bulb, which was gathered and used as a food source by tribes in the Pacific Northwest, and were an important food source for the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804–1806). Prolonged pit cooking converts the high levels of inulin inherent in Camassia to digestible sugars. Hence, Camassia was a sweetener as well as an important trade item. The gathering of Camassia illustrates local systems of land management: family plots were well tended throughout generations and kept clear of weeds and rocks, actively maintained by hand and controlled burns for long-term harvest. Cakes have been formed, cooked and dried for storage and trade. Delicious camassia recipes.

Flowers are blue-purple, smaller than C. leichtlinii, as are the bulbs. Even in the wild, large numbers of camas can color an entire meadow blue-violet. Used for centuries, baked in pit ovens whence the bulbs which contain inulins caramelize into a delicious. — Dr. Alan Kapler, Peace Seeds of Corvallis, OR.

Learn More
  • camassia quamash image##Photo: Walter Siegmund##

    Photo: Walter Siegmund

    📷
  • camassia quamash image##Photo: Walter Siegmund##

    Photo: Walter Siegmund

    📷
  • camassia quamash image##Photo: Ben Cody##

    Photo: Ben Cody

    📷
  • camassia quamash image##Sunrise at Camas Prairie Centennial Park. Photo: Charles Knowles##

    Sunrise at Camas Prairie Centennial Park. Photo: Charles Knowles

    📷
  • camassia quamash image##Camas meadow near Bovill, Idaho. Photo: Robbiegiles##

    Camas meadow near Bovill, Idaho. Photo: Robbiegiles

    📷

Camassia quamash

Camassia quamash

Deep purple-blue five pedal flowers appear in late spring to early summer, grows to 1’ (0.3 m). This bulbflower naturalizes well in gardens. Keep 15 cm deep flats in semi-shaded location. This will form a sod or turf which can be cut up and placed in gardens...

Deep purple-blue five pedal flowers appear in late spring to early summer, grows to 1’ (0.3 m). This bulbflower naturalizes well in gardens. Keep 15 cm deep flats in semi-shaded location. This will form a sod or turf which can be cut up and placed in gardens, meadow planting or landscaping.

The egg-shaped bulbs, 2–4 cm long, were harvested in the autumn, once the flowers have withered, then pit-roasted or boiled by women of the Nez Perce, Cree and Blackfoot tribes. A pit-cooked camas bulb looks and tastes something like baked sweet potato, but sweeter, and with more crystalline fibers due to the presence of inulin in the bulbs. People have also dried the bulbs to then be pounded into flour. In 1998, Gurusiddiah and Kapuler analyzed the juice of a camas bulb and found 15/20 amino acids used in protein synthesis in the juice. The highest amounts were, in descending order, arginine, cysteine, threonine, isoleucine, aspartic acid, tyrosine, serine and histidine. In comparison with other vegetables, the camas is unusually high in some of the rarer amino acids needed by our bodies for making proteins. Also known as camas, small camas, common camas, camash, quamash and Camas Hyacinth, minor.

Tags: Color: Purple, Heritage: Heirloom, Season: Spring Fall, Seed: Safe Seed Pledge.

Native to western North America in large areas of southern Canada and the northwestern United States, from British Columbia and Alberta to California and east from Washington state to Montana and Wyoming. The genus name comes from the Nez Perce Indian name for this plant, and means "sweet". Qém’es, a term for the plant's bulb, which was gathered and used as a food source by tribes in the Pacific Northwest, and were an important food source for the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804–1806). Prolonged pit cooking converts the high levels of inulin inherent in Camassia to digestible sugars. Hence, Camassia was a sweetener as well as an important trade item. The gathering of Camassia illustrates local systems of land management: family plots were well tended throughout generations and kept clear of weeds and rocks, actively maintained by hand and controlled burns for long-term harvest. Cakes have been formed, cooked and dried for storage and trade. Delicious camassia recipes.

Flowers are blue-purple, smaller than C. leichtlinii, as are the bulbs. Even in the wild, large numbers of camas can color an entire meadow blue-violet. Used for centuries, baked in pit ovens whence the bulbs which contain inulins caramelize into a delicious. — Dr. Alan Kapler, Peace Seeds of Corvallis, OR.

Learn More
HOW TO GROW CAMASSIA QUAMASH

Cold stratify seeds for 42–100 days at 34–41ºF (1-5ºC). Or, sow in 15 cm deep trays or pots in the fall to break dormancy naturally. Seedlings require moisture through the spring growing period. The bulb grows best in well-drained soil high in humus. It will grow in lightly shaded forest areas, on rocky outcrops, in open meadows, prairies, alongside streams and rivers. The plants may be divided in autumn after the leaves have withered. Plant outdoors in the fall or early winter for best root development. Seedlings prefer cool temps, 1–2” or organic mulch covering and little weed competition the first season. Late summer burning can promote the vigor. The plant spreads by seed. Soil pH 5.1-7.8. Hardiness zones 4–7. Perennial.

Average 7,300 seeds per ounce, average 116,900 seeds per pound. Usual seed life 3–5 years.

Planting Depth 1/4"
Soil Temp. Germ. 39–40ºF stratify
Days to Germ. 2–4 months
Plant Spacing 3–4” to 6–8”
Row Spacing 6–12”
Days To Maturity 2–5 years
Full Sun, Wet Climate
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