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BabyBeet

150 Seeds

Qty: 1 - $3.50

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SEED CALCULATOR

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Direct Sow
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Number of Plants 0

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SEED CALCULATOR

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Number of Seeds: 0

Seeds per 100 feet: 0

Multi Color

Sorghum bicolor
HOW TO GROW CORN, BROOM

Direct seed from the last frost date through mid-June when the soil temperature is at least 60–70°F (15–21°C). In short-season areas, broom corn should be planted as early as possible to ensure adequate time to reach maturity. For good pollination and full ears, plant in blocks of 3-6 rows instead of one long row. Thin seedlings to 8" apart. As a grass, rather than a typical corn, broom corn does not cross-pollinate with members of the Zea mays species. Harvest at different times to get variation in the color of the seed heads. Soil pH 6.0–6.8. Hardiness zones 5–12. Annual.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 1,350 seeds per ounce. Usual seed life: 5 years.

Planting Depth 1/4–1/2”
Soil Temp. Germ. 55–65˚F
Days to Germ. 4–21
Plant Spacing 8”
Row Spacing 30–36”
Days To Maturity 110–120
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained
  • Multi Color corn, broom image####

  • 100 Seeds$3.95
  • 1000 Seeds$23.70
Mixed broom color of Red, Purple, Brown and Yellow seed heads. Approximately 5–12 stems plant. Grows to 8–10’. Drought tolerant. Perfect for fall decorating. Broom corn is not actually a corn, but a tall, attractive, annual ornamental corn-like grass with a graceful and distinctly tropical appearance. The stalks are...
Mixed broom color of Red, Purple, Brown and Yellow seed heads. Approximately 5–12 stems plant. Grows to 8–10’. Drought tolerant. Perfect for fall decorating. Broom corn is not actually a corn, but a tall, attractive, annual ornamental corn-like grass with a graceful and distinctly tropical appearance. The stalks are similar to corn but do not produce ears. Seed heads appear from the tops of the plants instead of a tassel. When left unharvested, the seeds can be used as a winter food source for wildlife. Tags: Color: Multi Color, Specialty: Drought Tolerant, Heritage: Heirloom,New Listing, Certification: Organic.

Sorghum bicolor, commonly called sorghum and also known as great millet, durra, jowari, or milo, is a grass species cultivated for its grain, which is used for food for humans, animal feed and ethanol production. Sorghum originated in northern Africa, and is now cultivated widely in tropical and subtropical regions. Sorghum is the world's fifth-most important cereal crop after rice, wheat, maize, and barley. S. bicolor is typically an annual, but some cultivars are perennial. It grows in clumps that may reach over 4 m high. The grain is small, ranging from 2 to 4 mm in diameter. Sweet sorghums are sorghum cultivars that are primarily grown for foliage, syrup production, and ethanol; they are taller than those grown for grain. Sorghum bicolor is the cultivated species of sorghum; its wild relatives make up the botanical genus Sorghum.

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  • Multi Color corn, broom image####

Multi Color

Sorghum bicolor
Mixed broom color of Red, Purple, Brown and Yellow seed heads. Approximately 5–12 stems plant. Grows to 8–10’. Drought tolerant. Perfect for fall decorating. Broom corn is not actually a corn, but a tall, attractive, annual ornamental corn-like grass with a gra...
Mixed broom color of Red, Purple, Brown and Yellow seed heads. Approximately 5–12 stems plant. Grows to 8–10’. Drought tolerant. Perfect for fall decorating. Broom corn is not actually a corn, but a tall, attractive, annual ornamental corn-like grass with a graceful and distinctly tropical appearance. The stalks are similar to corn but do not produce ears. Seed heads appear from the tops of the plants instead of a tassel. When left unharvested, the seeds can be used as a winter food source for wildlife. Tags: Color: Multi Color, Specialty: Drought Tolerant, Heritage: Heirloom,New Listing, Certification: Organic.

Sorghum bicolor, commonly called sorghum and also known as great millet, durra, jowari, or milo, is a grass species cultivated for its grain, which is used for food for humans, animal feed and ethanol production. Sorghum originated in northern Africa, and is now cultivated widely in tropical and subtropical regions. Sorghum is the world's fifth-most important cereal crop after rice, wheat, maize, and barley. S. bicolor is typically an annual, but some cultivars are perennial. It grows in clumps that may reach over 4 m high. The grain is small, ranging from 2 to 4 mm in diameter. Sweet sorghums are sorghum cultivars that are primarily grown for foliage, syrup production, and ethanol; they are taller than those grown for grain. Sorghum bicolor is the cultivated species of sorghum; its wild relatives make up the botanical genus Sorghum.

Learn More
HOW TO GROW CORN, BROOM

Direct seed from the last frost date through mid-June when the soil temperature is at least 60–70°F (15–21°C). In short-season areas, broom corn should be planted as early as possible to ensure adequate time to reach maturity. For good pollination and full ears, plant in blocks of 3-6 rows instead of one long row. Thin seedlings to 8" apart. As a grass, rather than a typical corn, broom corn does not cross-pollinate with members of the Zea mays species. Harvest at different times to get variation in the color of the seed heads. Soil pH 6.0–6.8. Hardiness zones 5–12. Annual.

Days from maturity calculated from the date of seeding. Average 1,350 seeds per ounce. Usual seed life: 5 years.

Planting Depth 1/4–1/2”
Soil Temp. Germ. 55–65˚F
Days to Germ. 4–21
Plant Spacing 8”
Row Spacing 30–36”
Days To Maturity 110–120
Full Sun, Moist Well Drained
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